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revision 1.67, Fri Sep 29 15:00:17 2006 UTC revision 1.97, Tue Apr 29 06:01:21 2008 UTC
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1  #  # -*- perl -*-
2    ########################################################################
3  # Copyright (c) 2003-2006 University of Chicago and Fellowship  # Copyright (c) 2003-2006 University of Chicago and Fellowship
4  # for Interpretations of Genomes. All Rights Reserved.  # for Interpretations of Genomes. All Rights Reserved.
5  #  #
# Line 13  Line 14 
14  # at info@ci.uchicago.edu or the Fellowship for Interpretation of  # at info@ci.uchicago.edu or the Fellowship for Interpretation of
15  # Genomes at veronika@thefig.info or download a copy from  # Genomes at veronika@thefig.info or download a copy from
16  # http://www.theseed.org/LICENSE.TXT.  # http://www.theseed.org/LICENSE.TXT.
17  #  ########################################################################
18    
19  package Tracer;  package Tracer;
20    
21      require Exporter;      require Exporter;
22      @ISA = ('Exporter');      @ISA = ('Exporter');
23      @EXPORT = qw(Trace T TSetup QTrace Confess Cluck Min Max Assert Open OpenDir TICK StandardSetup ScriptSetup ScriptFinish Insure ChDir);      @EXPORT = qw(Trace T TSetup QTrace Confess Cluck Min Max Assert Open OpenDir TICK StandardSetup EmergencyKey ETracing Constrain Insure ChDir Emergency);
24      @EXPORT_OK = qw(GetFile GetOptions Merge MergeOptions ParseCommand ParseRecord UnEscape Escape);      @EXPORT_OK = qw(GetFile GetOptions Merge MergeOptions ParseCommand ParseRecord UnEscape Escape PrintLine PutLine);
25      use strict;      use strict;
26      use Carp qw(longmess croak);      use Carp qw(longmess croak carp);
27      use CGI;      use CGI;
28      use Cwd;      use Cwd;
29      use FIG_Config;      use FIG_Config;
# Line 34  Line 35 
35      use LWP::UserAgent;      use LWP::UserAgent;
36      use Time::HiRes 'gettimeofday';      use Time::HiRes 'gettimeofday';
37      use URI::Escape;      use URI::Escape;
38        use Time::Local;
39    
40  =head1 Tracing and Debugging Helpers  =head1 Tracing and Debugging Helpers
41    
42  =head2 Introduction  =head2 Tracing
43    
44  This package provides simple tracing for debugging and reporting purposes. To use it simply call the  This package provides simple tracing for debugging and reporting purposes. To use it simply call the
45  L</TSetup> method to set the options and call L</Trace> to write out trace messages. Each trace  L</TSetup> or L</ETracing> method to set the options and call L</Trace> to write out trace messages.
46  message has a I<trace level> and I<category> associated with it. In addition, the tracing package itself  L</TSetup> and L</ETracing> both establish a I<trace level> and a list of I<categories>. Similarly,
47  has a list of categories and a single trace level set by the B<TSetup> method. Only messages whose trace  each trace message has a I<trace level> and I<category> associated with it. Only messages whose trace
48  level is less than or equal to this package's trace level and whose category is activated will  level is less than or equal to the setup trace level and whose category is activated will
49  be written. Thus, a higher trace level on a message indicates that the message  be written. Thus, a higher trace level on a message indicates that the message
50  is less likely to be seen. A higher trace level passed to B<TSetup> means more trace messages will  is less likely to be seen, while a higher trace level passed to B<TSetup> means more trace messages will
51  appear. To generate a trace message, use the following syntax.  appear.
52    
53    =head3 Putting Trace Messages in Your Code
54    
55    To generate a trace message, use the following syntax.
56    
57  C<< Trace($message) if T(errors => 4); >>      Trace($message) if T(errors => 4);
58    
59  This statement will produce a trace message if the trace level is 4 or more and the C<errors>  This statement will produce a trace message if the trace level is 4 or more and the C<errors>
60  category is active. Note that the special category C<main> is always active, so  category is active. There is a special category C<main> that is always active, so
61    
62  C<< Trace($message) if T(main => 4); >>      Trace($message) if T(main => 4);
63    
64  will trace if the trace level is 4 or more.  will trace if the trace level is 4 or more.
65    
# Line 61  Line 67 
67  following call is made in the B<Sprout> package, it will appear if the C<Sprout> category is  following call is made in the B<Sprout> package, it will appear if the C<Sprout> category is
68  active and the trace level is 2 or more.  active and the trace level is 2 or more.
69    
70  C<< Trace($message) if T(2); >>      Trace($message) if T(2);
71    
72  To set up tracing, you call the L</TSetup> method. The method takes as input a trace level, a list  In scripts, where no package name is available, the category defaults to C<main>.
73  of category names, and a set of options. The trace level and list of category names are  
74    =head3 Custom Tracing
75    
76    Many programs have customized tracing configured using the L</TSetup> method. This is no longer
77    the preferred method, but a knowledge of how custom tracing works can make the more modern
78    L</Emergency Tracing> easier to understand.
79    
80    To set up custom tracing, you call the L</TSetup> method. The method takes as input a trace level,
81    a list of category names, and a destination. The trace level and list of category names are
82  specified as a space-delimited string. Thus  specified as a space-delimited string. Thus
83    
84  C<< TSetup('3 errors Sprout ERDB', 'HTML'); >>      TSetup('3 errors Sprout ERDB', 'TEXT');
85    
86  sets the trace level to 3, activates the C<errors>, C<Sprout>, and C<ERDB> categories, and  sets the trace level to 3, activates the C<errors>, C<Sprout>, and C<ERDB> categories, and
87  specifies that messages should be output as HTML paragraphs.  specifies that messages should be sent to the standard output.
88    
89  To turn on tracing for ALL categories, use an asterisk. The call below sets every category to  To turn on tracing for ALL categories, use an asterisk. The call below sets every category to
90  level 3 and writes the output to the standard error output. This sort of thing might be  level 3 and writes the output to the standard error output. This sort of thing might be
91  useful in a CGI environment.  useful in a CGI environment.
92    
93  C<< TSetup('3 *', 'WARN'); >>      TSetup('3 *', 'WARN');
94    
95  In addition to HTML and file output for trace messages, you can specify that the trace messages  In addition standard error and file output for trace messages, you can specify that the trace messages
96  be queued. The messages can then be retrieved by calling the L</QTrace> method. This approach  be queued. The messages can then be retrieved by calling the L</QTrace> method. This approach
97  is useful if you are building a web page. Instead of having the trace messages interspersed with  is useful if you are building a web page. Instead of having the trace messages interspersed with
98  the page output, they can be gathered together and displayed at the end of the page. This makes  the page output, they can be gathered together and displayed at the end of the page. This makes
99  it easier to debug page formatting problems.  it easier to debug page formatting problems.
100    
101  Finally, you can specify that all trace messages be emitted as warnings.  Finally, you can specify that all trace messages be emitted to a file, or the standard output and
102    a file at the same time. To trace to a file, specify the filename with an output character in front
103    of it.
104    
105        TSetup('4 SQL', ">$fileName");
106    
107    To trace to the standard output and a file at the same time, put a C<+> in front of the angle
108    bracket.
109    
110        TSetup('3 *', "+>$fileName");
111    
112  The flexibility of tracing makes it superior to simple use of directives like C<die> and C<warn>.  The flexibility of tracing makes it superior to simple use of directives like C<die> and C<warn>.
113  Tracer calls can be left in the code with minimal overhead and then turned on only when needed.  Tracer calls can be left in the code with minimal overhead and then turned on only when needed.
114  Thus, debugging information is available and easily retrieved even when the application is  Thus, debugging information is available and easily retrieved even when the application is
115  being used out in the field.  being used out in the field.
116    
117    =head3 Trace Levels
118    
119  There is no hard and fast rule on how to use trace levels. The following is therefore only  There is no hard and fast rule on how to use trace levels. The following is therefore only
120  a suggestion.  a suggestion.
121    
# Line 121  Line 146 
146    
147  =back  =back
148    
149    The format of trace messages is important because some utilities analyze trace files.
150    There are three fields-- the time stamp, the category name, and the text.
151    The time stamp is between square brackets and the category name between angle brackets.
152    After the category name there is a colon (C<:>) followed by the message text.
153    If the square brackets or angle brackets are missing, then the trace management
154    utilities assume that they are encountering a set of pre-formatted lines.
155    
156    Note, however, that this formatting is done automatically by the tracing functions. You
157    only need to know about it if you want to parse a trace file.
158    
159    =head3 Emergency Tracing
160    
161    Sometimes, you need a way for tracing to happen automatically without putting parameters
162    in a form or on the command line. Emergency tracing does this. You invoke emergency tracing
163    from the debug form, which is accessed from the [[DebugConsole]]. Emergency tracing requires
164    that you specify a tracing key. For command-line tools, the key is
165    taken from the C<TRACING> environment variable. For web services, the key is taken from
166    a cookie. Either way, the key tells the tracing facility who you are, so that you control
167    the tracing in your environment without stepping on other users.
168    
169    The key can be anything you want. If you don't have a key, the C<SetPassword> page will
170    generate one for you.
171    
172    You can activate and de-activate emergency tracing from the debugging control panel, as
173    well as display the trace file itself.
174    
175    To enable emergency tracing in your code, call
176    
177        ETracing($cgi)
178    
179    from a web script and
180    
181        ETracing()
182    
183    from a command-line script.
184    
185    The web script will look for the tracing key in the cookies, and the command-line
186    script will look for it in the C<TRACING> environment variable. If you are
187    using the L</StandardSetup> method or a [[WebApplication]], emergency tracing
188    will be configured automatically.
189    
190  =cut  =cut
191    
192  # Declare the configuration variables.  # Declare the configuration variables.
193    
194  my $Destination = "NONE";   # Description of where to send the trace output.  my $Destination = "WARN";   # Description of where to send the trace output.
195  my $TeeFlag = 0;            # TRUE if output is going to a file and to the  my $TeeFlag = 0;            # TRUE if output is going to a file and to the
196                              # standard output                              # standard output
197  my %Categories = ( main => 1 );  my %Categories = ( main => 1 );
198                              # hash of active category names                              # hash of active category names
199    my @LevelNames = qw(error warn notice info detail);
200  my $TraceLevel = 0;         # trace level; a higher trace level produces more  my $TraceLevel = 0;         # trace level; a higher trace level produces more
201                              # messages                              # messages
202  my @Queue = ();             # queued list of trace messages.  my @Queue = ();             # queued list of trace messages.
203  my $LastCategory = "main";  # name of the last category interrogated  my $LastCategory = "main";  # name of the last category interrogated
204    my $LastLevel = 0;          # level of the last test call
205  my $SetupCount = 0;         # number of times TSetup called  my $SetupCount = 0;         # number of times TSetup called
206  my $AllTrace = 0;           # TRUE if we are tracing all categories.  my $AllTrace = 0;           # TRUE if we are tracing all categories.
207    
208  =head2 Public Methods  =head2 Tracing Methods
209    
210    =head3 Setups
211    
212        my $count = Tracer::Setups();
213    
214    Return the number of times L</TSetup> has been called.
215    
216    This method allows for the creation of conditional tracing setups where, for example, we
217    may want to set up tracing if nobody else has done it before us.
218    
219    =cut
220    
221    sub Setups {
222        return $SetupCount;
223    }
224    
225  =head3 TSetup  =head3 TSetup
226    
227  C<< TSetup($categoryList, $target); >>      TSetup($categoryList, $target);
228    
229  This method is used to specify the trace options. The options are stored as package data  This method is used to specify the trace options. The options are stored as package data
230  and interrogated by the L</Trace> and L</T> methods.  and interrogated by the L</Trace> and L</T> methods.
# Line 200  Line 283 
283          }          }
284          if ($target =~ m/^>[^>]/) {          if ($target =~ m/^>[^>]/) {
285              open TRACEFILE, $target;              open TRACEFILE, $target;
286              print TRACEFILE Now() . " Tracing initialized.\n";              print TRACEFILE "[" . Now() . "] [Tracer] Tracing initialized.\n";
287              close TRACEFILE;              close TRACEFILE;
288              $Destination = ">$target";              $Destination = ">$target";
289          } else {          } else {
# Line 213  Line 296 
296      $SetupCount++;      $SetupCount++;
297  }  }
298    
299  =head3 StandardSetup  =head3 SetLevel
300    
301  C<< my ($options, @parameters) = StandardSetup(\@categories, \%options, $parmHelp, @ARGV); >>      Tracer::SetLevel($newLevel);
302    
303  This method performs standard command-line parsing and tracing setup. The return  Modify the trace level. A higher trace level will cause more messages to appear.
 values are a hash of the command-line options and a list of the positional  
 parameters. Tracing is automatically set up and the command-line options are  
 validated.  
304    
305  This is a complex method that does a lot of grunt work. The parameters can  =over 4
 be more easily understood, however, once they are examined individually.  
306    
307  The I<categories> parameter is the most obtuse. It is a reference to a list of  =item newLevel
 special-purpose tracing categories. Most tracing categories are PERL package  
 names. So, for example, if you wanted to turn on tracing inside the B<Sprout>,  
 B<ERDB>, and B<SproutLoad> packages, you would specify the categories  
308    
309      ["Sprout", "SproutLoad", "ERDB"]  Proposed new trace level.
310    
311  This would cause trace messages in the specified three packages to appear in  =back
 the output. There are threer special tracing categories that are automatically  
 handled by this method. In other words, if you used L</TSetup> you would need  
 to include these categories manually, but if you use this method they are turned  
 on automatically.  
312    
313  =over 4  =cut
314    
315  =item FIG  sub SetLevel {
316        $TraceLevel = $_[0];
317    }
318    
319  Turns on trace messages inside the B<FIG> package.  =head3 ParseDate
320    
321  =item SQL      my $time = Tracer::ParseDate($dateString);
322    
323  Traces SQL commands and activity.  Convert a date into a PERL time number. This method expects a date-like string
324    and parses it into a number. The string must be vaguely date-like or it will
325    return an undefined value. Our requirement is that a month and day be
326    present and that three pieces of the date string (time of day, month and day,
327    year) be separated by likely delimiters, such as spaces, commas, and such-like.
328    
329  =item Tracer  If a time of day is present, it must be in military time with two digits for
330    everything but the hour.
331    
332  Traces error messages and call stacks.  The year must be exactly four digits.
333    
334  =back  Additional stuff can be in the string. We presume it's time zones or weekdays or something
335    equally innocuous. This means, however, that a sufficiently long sentence with date-like
336    parts in it may be interpreted as a date. Hopefully this will not be a problem.
337    
338  C<SQL> is only turned on if the C<-sql> option is specified in the command line.  It should be guaranteed that this method will parse the output of the L</Now> function.
 The trace level is specified using the C<-trace> command-line option. For example,  
 the following command line for C<TransactFeatures> turns on SQL tracing and runs  
 all tracing at level 3.  
339    
340      TransactFeatures -trace=3 -sql register ../xacts IDs.tbl  The parameters are as follows.
341    
342  Standard tracing is output to the standard output and echoed to the file  =over 4
 C<trace>I<$$>C<.log> in the FIG temporary directory, where I<$$> is the  
 process ID. You can also specify the C<user> parameter to put a user ID  
 instead of a process ID in the trace file name. So, for example  
343    
344  The default trace level is 2. To get all messages, specify a trace level of 4.  =item dateString
 For a genome-by-genome update, use 3.  
345    
346      TransactFeatures -trace=3 -sql -user=Bruce register ../xacts IDs.tbl  The date string to convert.
347    
348  would send the trace output to C<traceBruce.log> in the temporary directory.  =item RETURN
349    
350  The I<options> parameter is a reference to a hash containing the command-line  Returns a PERL time, that is, a number of seconds since the epoch, or C<undef> if
351  options, their default values, and an explanation of what they mean. Command-line  the date string is invalid. A valid date string must contain a month and day.
 options may be in the form of switches or keywords. In the case of a switch, the  
 option value is 1 if it is specified and 0 if it is not specified. In the case  
 of a keyword, the value is separated from the option name by an equal sign. You  
 can see this last in the command-line example above.  
352    
353  You can specify a different default trace level by setting C<$options->{trace}>  =back
 prior to calling this method.  
354    
355  An example at this point would help. Consider, for example, the command-line utility  =cut
 C<TransactFeatures>. It accepts a list of positional parameters plus the options  
 C<safe>, C<noAlias>, C<start>, and C<tblFiles>. To start up this command, we execute  
 the following code.  
356    
357      my ($options, @parameters) = Tracer::StandardSetup(["DocUtils"],  # Universal month conversion table.
358                          { safe => [0, "use database transactions"],  use constant MONTHS => {    Jan =>  0, January   =>  0, '01' =>  0,  '1' =>  0,
359                            noAlias => [0, "do not expect aliases in CHANGE transactions"],                              Feb =>  1, February  =>  1, '02' =>  1,  '2' =>  1,
360                            start => [' ', "start with this genome"],                              Mar =>  2, March     =>  2, '03' =>  2,  '3' =>  2,
361                            tblFiles => [0, "output TBL files containing the corrected IDs"] },                              Apr =>  3, April     =>  3, '04' =>  3,  '4' =>  3,
362                          "command transactionDirectory IDfile",                              May =>  4, May       =>  4, '05' =>  4,  '5' =>  4,
363                        @ARGV);                              Jun =>  5, June      =>  5, '06' =>  5,  '6' =>  5,
364                                Jul =>  6, July      =>  6, '07' =>  6,  '7' =>  6,
365                                Aug =>  7, August    =>  7, '08' =>  7,  '8' =>  7,
366                                Sep =>  8, September =>  8, '09' =>  8,  '9' =>  8,
367                                Oct =>  9, October  =>   9, '10' =>  9,
368                                Nov => 10, November =>  10, '11' => 10,
369                                Dec => 11, December =>  11, '12' => 11
370                            };
371    
372    sub ParseDate {
373        # Get the parameters.
374        my ($dateString) = @_;
375        # Declare the return variable.
376        my $retVal;
377        # Find the month and day of month. There are two ways that can happen. We check for the
378        # numeric style first. That way, if the user's done something like "Sun 12/22", then we
379        # won't be fooled into thinking the month is Sunday.
380        if ($dateString =~ m#\b(\d{1,2})/(\d{1,2})\b# || $dateString =~ m#\b(\w+)\s(\d{1,2})\b#) {
381            my ($mon, $mday) = (MONTHS->{$1}, $2);
382            # Insist that the month and day are valid.
383            if (defined($mon) && $2 >= 1 && $2 <= 31) {
384                # Find the time.
385                my ($hour, $min, $sec) = (0, 0, 0);
386                if ($dateString =~ /\b(\d{1,2}):(\d{2}):(\d{2})\b/) {
387                    ($hour, $min, $sec) = ($1, $2, $3);
388                }
389                # Find the year.
390                my $year;
391                if ($dateString =~ /\b(\d{4})\b/) {
392                    $year = $1;
393                } else {
394                    # Get the default year, which is this one. Note we must convert it to
395                    # the four-digit value expected by "timelocal".
396                    (undef, undef, undef, undef, undef, $year) = localtime();
397                    $year += 1900;
398                }
399                $retVal = timelocal($sec, $min, $hour, $mday, $mon, $year);
400            }
401        }
402        # Return the result.
403        return $retVal;
404    }
405    
406  The call to C<ParseCommand> specifies the default values for the options and  =head3 LogErrors
 stores the actual options in a hash that is returned as C<$options>. The  
 positional parameters are returned in C<@parameters>.  
407    
408  The following is a sample command line for C<TransactFeatures>.      Tracer::LogErrors($fileName);
409    
410      TransactFeatures -trace=2 -noAlias register ../xacts IDs.tbl  Route the standard error output to a log file.
411    
412  In this case, C<register>, C<../xacts>, and C<IDs.tbl> are the positional  =over 4
 parameters, and would find themselves in I<@parameters> after executing the  
 above code fragment. The tracing would be set to level 2, and the categories  
 would be C<FIG>, C<Tracer>, and <DocUtils>. C<FIG> and C<Tracer> are standard,  
 and C<DocUtils> was included because it came in within the first parameter  
 to this method. The I<$options> hash would be  
413    
414      { trace => 2, sql => 0, safe => 0,  =item fileName
       noAlias => 1, start => ' ', tblFiles => 0 }  
415    
416  Use of C<StandardSetup> in this way provides a simple way of performing  Name of the file to receive the error output.
 standard tracing setup and command-line parsing. Note that the caller is  
 not even aware of the command-line switches C<-trace> and C<-sql>, which  
 are used by this method to control the tracing. If additional tracing features  
 need to be added in the future, they can be processed by this method without  
 upsetting the command-line utilities.  
417    
418  If the C<background> option is specified on the command line, then the  =back
 standard and error outputs will be directed to files in the temporary  
 directory, using the same suffix as the trace file. So, if the command  
 line specified  
419    
420      -user=Bruce -background  =cut
421    
422  then the trace output would go to C<traceBruce.log>, the standard output to  sub LogErrors {
423  C<outBruce.log>, and the error output to C<errBruce.log>. This is designed to      # Get the file name.
424  simplify starting a command in the background.      my ($fileName) = @_;
425        # Open the file as the standard error output.
426        open STDERR, '>', $fileName;
427    }
428    
429  Finally, if the special option C<-h> is specified, the option names will  =head3 Trace
 be traced at level 0 and the program will exit without processing.  
 This provides a limited help capability. For example, if the user enters  
430    
431      TransactFeatures -h      Trace($message);
432    
433  he would see the following output.  Write a trace message to the target location specified in L</TSetup>. If there has not been
434    any prior call to B<TSetup>.
435    
436      TransactFeatures [options] command transactionDirectory IDfile  =over 4
         -trace    tracing level (default 2)  
         -sql      trace SQL commands  
         -safe     use database transactions  
         -noAlias  do not expect aliases in CHANGE transactions  
         -start    start with this genome  
         -tblFiles output TBL files containing the corrected IDs  
437    
438  The caller has the option of modifying the tracing scheme by placing a value  =item message
 for C<trace> in the incoming options hash. The default value can be overridden,  
 or the tracing to the standard output can be turned off by suffixing a minus  
 sign to the trace level. So, for example,  
439    
440      { trace => [0, "tracing level (default 0)"],  Message to write.
        ...  
441    
442  would set the default trace level to 0 instead of 2, while  =back
443    
444      { trace => ["2-", "tracing level (default 2)"],  =cut
        ...  
445    
446  would leave the default at 2, but trace only to the log file, not to the  sub Trace {
447  standard output.      # Get the parameters.
448        my ($message) = @_;
449        # Strip off any line terminators at the end of the message. We will add
450        # new-line stuff ourselves.
451        my $stripped = Strip($message);
452        # Compute the caller information.
453        my ($callPackage, $callFile, $callLine) = caller();
454        my $callFileTitle = basename($callFile);
455        # Check the caller.
456        if ($callFileTitle ne "Tracer\.pm") {
457            # The caller isn't us, so add the caller info to the message.
458            $stripped = "[$callFileTitle $callLine] $stripped";
459        }
460        # Get the timestamp.
461        my $timeStamp = Now();
462        # Build the prefix.
463        my $level = $LevelNames[$LastLevel] || "($LastLevel)";
464        my $prefix = "[$timeStamp] [$level] ";
465        # Format the message.
466        my $formatted = "$prefix $stripped";
467        # Process according to the destination.
468        if ($Destination eq "TEXT") {
469            # Write the message to the standard output.
470            print "$formatted\n";
471        } elsif ($Destination eq "ERROR") {
472            # Write the message to the error output. Here, we want our prefix fields.
473            print STDERR "$formatted\n";
474        } elsif ($Destination eq "WARN") {
475            # Emit the message to the standard error output. It is presumed that the
476            # error logger will add its own prefix fields
477            print STDERR "$stripped\n";
478        } elsif ($Destination eq "QUEUE") {
479            # Push the message into the queue.
480            push @Queue, "$formatted";
481        } elsif ($Destination eq "HTML") {
482            # Convert the message to HTML and write it to the standard output.
483            my $escapedMessage = CGI::escapeHTML($stripped);
484            print "<p>$timeStamp $LastCategory $LastLevel: $escapedMessage</p>\n";
485        } elsif ($Destination =~ m/^>>/) {
486            # Write the trace message to an output file.
487            open(TRACING, $Destination) || die "Tracing open for \"$Destination\" failed: $!";
488            print TRACING "$formatted\n";
489            close TRACING;
490            # If the Tee flag is on, echo it to the standard output.
491            if ($TeeFlag) {
492                print "$formatted\n";
493            }
494        }
495    }
496    
497  The parameters to this method are as follows.  =head3 T
498    
499  =over 4      my $switch = T($category, $traceLevel);
500    
501  =item categories      or
502    
503  Reference to a list of tracing category names. These should be names of      my $switch = T($traceLevel);
 packages whose internal workings will need to be debugged to get the  
 command working.  
504    
505  =item options  Return TRUE if the trace level is at or above a specified value and the specified category
506    is active, else FALSE. If no category is specified, the caller's package name is used.
507    
508  Reference to a hash containing the legal options for the current command mapped  =over 4
 to their default values and descriptions. The user can override the defaults  
 by specifying the options as command-line switches prefixed by a hyphen.  
 Tracing-related options may be added to this hash. If the C<-h> option is  
 specified on the command line, the option descriptions will be used to  
 explain the options. To turn off tracing to the standard output, add a  
 minus sign to the value for C<trace> (see above).  
509    
510  =item parmHelp  =item category
511    
512  A string that vaguely describes the positional parameters. This is used  Category to which the message belongs. If not specified, the caller's package name is
513  if the user specifies the C<-h> option.  used.
514    
515  =item argv  =item traceLevel
516    
517  List of command line parameters, including the option switches, which must  Relevant tracing level.
 precede the positional parameters and be prefixed by a hyphen.  
518    
519  =item RETURN  =item RETURN
520    
521  Returns a list. The first element of the list is the reference to a hash that  TRUE if a message at the specified trace level would appear in the trace, else FALSE.
 maps the command-line option switches to their values. These will either be the  
 default values or overrides specified on the command line. The remaining  
 elements of the list are the position parameters, in order.  
522    
523  =back  =back
524    
525  =cut  =cut
526    
527  sub StandardSetup {  sub T {
528        # Declare the return variable.
529        my $retVal = 0;
530        # Only proceed if tracing is turned on.
531        if ($Destination ne "NONE") {
532      # Get the parameters.      # Get the parameters.
533      my ($categories, $options, $parmHelp, @argv) = @_;          my ($category, $traceLevel) = @_;
534      # Add the tracing options.          if (!defined $traceLevel) {
535      if (! exists $options->{trace}) {              # Here we have no category, so we need to get the calling package.
536          $options->{trace} = [2, "tracing level"];              # The calling package is normally the first parameter. If it is
537      }              # omitted, the first parameter will be the tracelevel. So, the
538      $options->{sql} = [0, "turn on SQL tracing"];              # first thing we do is shift the so-called category into the
539      $options->{h} = [0, "display command-line options"];              # $traceLevel variable where it belongs.
540      $options->{user} = [$$, "trace log file name suffix"];              $traceLevel = $category;
541      $options->{background} = [0, "spool standard and error output"];              my ($package, $fileName, $line) = caller;
542      # Create a parsing hash from the options hash. The parsing hash              # If there is no calling package, we default to "main".
543      # contains the default values rather than the default value              if (!$package) {
544      # and the description. While we're at it, we'll memorize the                  $category = "main";
     # length of the longest option name.  
     my $longestName = 0;  
     my %parseOptions = ();  
     for my $key (keys %{$options}) {  
         if (length $key > $longestName) {  
             $longestName = length $key;  
         }  
         $parseOptions{$key} = $options->{$key}->[0];  
     }  
     # Parse the command line.  
     my ($retOptions, @retParameters) = ParseCommand(\%parseOptions, @argv);  
     # Get the logfile suffix.  
     my $suffix = $retOptions->{user};  
     # Check for background mode.  
     if ($retOptions->{background}) {  
         my $outFileName = "$FIG_Config::temp/out$suffix.log";  
         my $errFileName = "$FIG_Config::temp/err$suffix.log";  
         open STDOUT, ">$outFileName";  
         open STDERR, ">$errFileName";  
     }  
     # Now we want to set up tracing. First, we need to know if SQL is to  
     # be traced.  
     my @cats = @{$categories};  
     if ($retOptions->{sql}) {  
         push @cats, "SQL";  
     }  
     # Add the default categories.  
     push @cats, "Tracer", "FIG";  
     # Next, we create the category string by joining the categories.  
     my $cats = join(" ", @cats);  
     # Check to determine whether or not the caller wants to turn off tracing  
     # to the standard output.  
     my $traceLevel = $retOptions->{trace};  
     my $textOKFlag = 1;  
     if ($traceLevel =~ /^(.)-/) {  
         $traceLevel = $1;  
         $textOKFlag = 0;  
     }  
     # Now we set up the trace mode.  
     my $traceMode;  
     # Verify that we can open a file in the FIG temporary directory.  
     my $traceFileName = "$FIG_Config::temp/trace$suffix.log";  
     if (open TESTTRACE, ">$traceFileName") {  
         # Here we can trace to a file.  
         $traceMode = ">$traceFileName";  
         if ($textOKFlag) {  
             # Echo to standard output if the text-OK flag is set.  
             $traceMode = "+$traceMode";  
         }  
         # Close the test file.  
         close TESTTRACE;  
     } else {  
         # Here we can't trace to a file. We trace to the standard output if it's  
         # okay, and the error log otherwise.  
         if ($textOKFlag) {  
             $traceMode = "TEXT";  
545          } else {          } else {
546              $traceMode = "WARN";                  my @cats = split /::/, $package;
547          }                  $category = $cats[$#cats];
548      }      }
     # Now set up the tracing.  
     TSetup("$traceLevel $cats", $traceMode);  
     # Check for the "h" option. If it is specified, dump the command-line  
     # options and exit the program.  
     if ($retOptions->{h}) {  
         $0 =~ m#[/\\](\w+)(\.pl)?$#i;  
         Trace("$1 [options] $parmHelp") if T(0);  
         for my $key (sort keys %{$options}) {  
             my $name = Pad($key, $longestName, 0, ' ');  
             my $desc = $options->{$key}->[1];  
             if ($options->{$key}->[0]) {  
                 $desc .= " (default " . $options->{$key}->[0] . ")";  
549              }              }
550              Trace("  $name $desc") if T(0);          # Save the category name and level.
551            $LastCategory = $category;
552            $LastLevel = $traceLevel;
553            # Convert it to lower case before we hash it.
554            $category = lc $category;
555            # Use the category and tracelevel to compute the result.
556            if (ref $traceLevel) {
557                Confess("Bad trace level.");
558            } elsif (ref $TraceLevel) {
559                Confess("Bad trace config.");
560          }          }
561          exit(0);          $retVal = ($traceLevel <= $TraceLevel && ($AllTrace || exists $Categories{$category}));
562      }      }
563      # Return the parsed parameters.      # Return the computed result.
564      return ($retOptions, @retParameters);      return $retVal;
565  }  }
566    
567  =head3 Setups  =head3 QTrace
568    
569  C<< my $count = Tracer::Setups(); >>      my $data = QTrace($format);
570    
571  Return the number of times L</TSetup> has been called.  Return the queued trace data in the specified format.
572    
573  This method allows for the creation of conditional tracing setups where, for example, we  =over 4
574  may want to set up tracing if nobody else has done it before us.  
575    =item format
576    
577    C<html> to format the data as an HTML list, C<text> to format it as straight text.
578    
579    =back
580    
581  =cut  =cut
582    
583  sub Setups {  sub QTrace {
584      return $SetupCount;      # Get the parameter.
585        my ($format) = @_;
586        # Create the return variable.
587        my $retVal = "";
588        # Only proceed if there is an actual queue.
589        if (@Queue) {
590            # Process according to the format.
591            if ($format =~ m/^HTML$/i) {
592                # Convert the queue into an HTML list.
593                $retVal = "<ul>\n";
594                for my $line (@Queue) {
595                    my $escapedLine = CGI::escapeHTML($line);
596                    $retVal .= "<li>$escapedLine</li>\n";
597                }
598                $retVal .= "</ul>\n";
599            } elsif ($format =~ m/^TEXT$/i) {
600                # Convert the queue into a list of text lines.
601                $retVal = join("\n", @Queue) . "\n";
602            }
603            # Clear the queue.
604            @Queue = ();
605        }
606        # Return the formatted list.
607        return $retVal;
608  }  }
609    
610  =head3 Open  =head3 Confess
611    
612  C<< my $handle = Open($fileHandle, $fileSpec, $message); >>      Confess($message);
613    
614  Open a file.  Trace the call stack and abort the program with the specified message. When used with
615    the OR operator and the L</Assert> method, B<Confess> can function as a debugging assert.
616    So, for example
617    
618  The I<$fileSpec> is essentially the second argument of the PERL C<open>      Assert($recNum >= 0) || Confess("Invalid record number $recNum.");
 function. The mode is specified using Unix-like shell information. So, for  
 example,  
619    
620      Open(\*LOGFILE, '>>/usr/spool/news/twitlog', "Could not open twit log.");  Will abort the program with a stack trace if the value of C<$recNum> is negative.
621    
622  would open for output appended to the specified file, and  =over 4
623    
624      Open(\*DATASTREAM, "| sort -u >$outputFile", "Could not open $outputFile.");  =item message
625    
626  would open a pipe that sorts the records written and removes duplicates. Note  Message to include in the trace.
 the use of file handle syntax in the Open call. To use anonymous file handles,  
 code as follows.  
627    
628      my $logFile = Open(undef, '>>/usr/spool/news/twitlog', "Could not open twit log.");  =back
629    
630  The I<$message> parameter is used if the open fails. If it is set to C<0>, then  =cut
 the open returns TRUE if successful and FALSE if an error occurred. Otherwise, a  
 failed open will throw an exception and the third parameter will be used to construct  
 an error message. If the parameter is omitted, a standard message is constructed  
 using the file spec.  
631    
632      Could not open "/usr/spool/news/twitlog"  sub Confess {
633        # Get the parameters.
634        my ($message) = @_;
635        # Set up the category and level.
636        $LastCategory = "(confess)";
637        $LastLevel = 0;
638        if (! defined($FIG_Config::no_tool_hdr)) {
639            # Here we have a tool header. Display its length so that the user can adjust the line numbers.
640            my $toolHeaderFile = "$FIG_Config::fig_disk/dist/releases/current/$FIG_Config::arch/tool_hdr";
641            # Only proceed if the tool header file is actually present.
642            if (-f $toolHeaderFile) {
643                my $fh;
644                if (open $fh, "<$toolHeaderFile") {
645                    my @lines = <$fh>;
646                    Trace("Tool header has " . scalar(@lines) . " lines.");
647                }
648            }
649        }
650        # Trace the call stack.
651        Cluck($message);
652        # Abort the program.
653        croak(">>> $message");
654    }
655    
656  Note that the mode characters are automatically cleaned from the file name.  =head3 Assert
 The actual error message from the file system will be captured and appended to the  
 message in any case.  
657    
658      Could not open "/usr/spool/news/twitlog": file not found.      Assert($condition1, $condition2, ... $conditionN);
659    
660  In some versions of PERL the only error message we get is a number, which  Return TRUE if all the conditions are true. This method can be used in conjunction with
661  corresponds to the C++ C<errno> value.  the OR operator and the L</Confess> method as a debugging assert.
662    So, for example
663    
664      Could not open "/usr/spool/news/twitlog": 6.      Assert($recNum >= 0) || Confess("Invalid record number $recNum.");
665    
666  =over 4  Will abort the program with a stack trace if the value of C<$recNum> is negative.
667    
668  =item fileHandle  =cut
669    sub Assert {
670        my $retVal = 1;
671        LOOP: for my $condition (@_) {
672            if (! $condition) {
673                $retVal = 0;
674                last LOOP;
675            }
676        }
677        return $retVal;
678    }
679    
680  File handle. If this parameter is C<undef>, a file handle will be generated  =head3 Cluck
 and returned as the value of this method.  
681    
682  =item fileSpec      Cluck($message);
683    
684  File name and mode, as per the PERL C<open> function.  Trace the call stack. Note that for best results, you should qualify the call with a
685    trace condition. For example,
686    
687  =item message (optional)      Cluck("Starting record parse.") if T(3);
688    
689  Error message to use if the open fails. If omitted, a standard error message  will only trace the stack if the trace level for the package is 3 or more.
 will be generated. In either case, the error information from the file system  
 is appended to the message. To specify a conditional open that does not throw  
 an error if it fails, use C<0>.  
690    
691  =item RETURN  =over 4
692    
693  Returns the name of the file handle assigned to the file, or C<undef> if the  =item message
694  open failed.  
695    Message to include in the trace.
696    
697  =back  =back
698    
699  =cut  =cut
700    
701  sub Open {  sub Cluck {
702      # Get the parameters.      # Get the parameters.
703      my ($fileHandle, $fileSpec, $message) = @_;      my ($message) = @_;
704      # Attempt to open the file.      # Trace what's happening.
705      my $rv = open $fileHandle, $fileSpec;      Trace("Stack trace for event: $message");
706      # If the open failed, generate an error message.      my $confession = longmess($message);
707      if (! $rv) {      # Convert the confession to a series of trace messages.
708          # Save the system error message.      for my $line (split /\s*\n/, $confession) {
709          my $sysMessage = $!;          # Only proceed if this call trace is for a method outside Tracer itself.
710          # See if we need a default message.          if ($line !~ /Tracer\.pm/) {
711          if (!$message) {              # Replace the leading tab with a series of spaces.
712              # Clean any obvious mode characters and leading spaces from the              $line =~ s/\t/    /;
713              # filename.              # Trace the line.
714              my ($fileName) = FindNamePart($fileSpec);              Trace($line);
             $message = "Could not open \"$fileName\"";  
715          }          }
         # Terminate with an error using the supplied message and the  
         # error message from the file system.  
         Confess("$message: $!");  
716      }      }
     # Return the file handle.  
     return $fileHandle;  
717  }  }
718    
719  =head3 FindNamePart  =head3 ScriptSetup (deprecated)
   
 C<< my ($fileName, $start, $len) = Tracer::FindNamePart($fileSpec); >>  
   
 Extract the portion of a file specification that contains the file name.  
720    
721  A file specification is the string passed to an C<open> call. It specifies the file      my ($cgi, $varHash) = ScriptSetup($noTrace);
 mode and name. In a truly complex situation, it can specify a pipe sequence. This  
 method assumes that the file name is whatever follows the first angle bracket  
 sequence.  So, for example, in the following strings the file name is  
 C</usr/fig/myfile.txt>.  
722    
723      >>/usr/fig/myfile.txt  Perform standard tracing and debugging setup for scripts. The value returned is
724      </usr/fig/myfile.txt  the CGI object followed by a pre-built variable hash. At the end of the script,
725      | sort -u > /usr/fig/myfile.txt  the client should call L</ScriptFinish> to output the web page.
726    
727  If the method cannot find a file name using its normal methods, it will return the  This method calls L</ETracing> to configure tracing, which allows the tracing
728  whole incoming string.  to be configured via the emergency tracing form on the debugging control panel.
729    Tracing will then be turned on automatically for all programs that use the L</ETracing>
730    method, which includes every program that uses this method or L</StandardSetup>.
731    
732  =over 4  =over 4
733    
734  =item fileSpec  =item noTrace (optional)
735    
736  File specification string from which the file name is to be extracted.  If specified, tracing will be suppressed. This is useful if the script wants to set up
737    tracing manually.
738    
739  =item RETURN  =item RETURN
740    
741  Returns a three-element list. The first element contains the file name portion of  Returns a two-element list consisting of a CGI query object and a variable hash for
742  the specified string, or the whole string if a file name cannot be found via normal  the output page.
 methods. The second element contains the start position of the file name portion and  
 the third element contains the length.  
743    
744  =back  =back
745    
746  =cut  =cut
747  #: Return Type $;  
748  sub FindNamePart {  sub ScriptSetup {
749      # Get the parameters.      # Get the parameters.
750      my ($fileSpec) = @_;      my ($noTrace) = @_;
751      # Default to the whole input string.      # Get the CGI query object.
752      my ($retVal, $pos, $len) = ($fileSpec, 0, length $fileSpec);      my $cgi = CGI->new();
753      # Parse out the file name if we can.      # Set up tracing if it's not suppressed.
754      if ($fileSpec =~ m/(<|>>?)(.+?)(\s*)$/) {      ETracing($cgi) unless $noTrace;
755          $retVal = $2;      # Create the variable hash.
756          $len = length $retVal;      my $varHash = { results => '' };
757          $pos = (length $fileSpec) - (length $3) - $len;      # Return the query object and variable hash.
758        return ($cgi, $varHash);
759    }
760    
761    =head3 ETracing
762    
763        ETracing($parameter);
764    
765    Set up emergency tracing. Emergency tracing is tracing that is turned
766    on automatically for any program that calls this method. The emergency
767    tracing parameters are stored in a a file identified by a tracing key.
768    If this method is called with a CGI object, then the tracing key is
769    taken from a cookie. If it is called with no parameters, then the tracing
770    key is taken from an environment variable. If it is called with a string,
771    the tracing key is that string.
772    
773    =over 4
774    
775    =item parameter
776    
777    A parameter from which the tracing key is computed. If it is a scalar,
778    that scalar is used as the tracing key. If it is a CGI object, the
779    tracing key is taken from the C<IP> cookie. If it is omitted, the
780    tracing key is taken from the C<TRACING> environment variable. If it
781    is a CGI object and emergency tracing is not on, the C<Trace> and
782    C<TF> parameters will be used to determine the type of tracing.
783    
784    =back
785    
786    =cut
787    
788    sub ETracing {
789        # Get the parameter.
790        my ($parameter) = @_;
791        # Check for CGI mode.
792        my $cgi = (ref $parameter eq 'CGI' ? $parameter : undef);
793        # Default to no tracing except errors.
794        my ($tracing, $dest) = ("0", "WARN");
795        # Check for emergency tracing.
796        my $tkey = EmergencyKey($parameter);
797        my $emergencyFile = EmergencyFileName($tkey);
798        if (-e $emergencyFile) {
799            # We have the file. Read in the data.
800            my @tracing = GetFile($emergencyFile);
801            # Pull off the time limit.
802            my $expire = shift @tracing;
803            # Convert it to seconds.
804            $expire *= 3600;
805            # Check the file data.
806            my $stat = stat($emergencyFile);
807            my ($now) = gettimeofday;
808            if ($now - $stat->mtime > $expire) {
809                # Delete the expired file.
810                unlink $emergencyFile;
811            } else {
812                # Emergency tracing is on. Pull off the destination and
813                # the trace level;
814                $dest = shift @tracing;
815                my $level = shift @tracing;
816                # Convert the destination to a real tracing destination.
817                # temp directory.
818                $dest = EmergencyTracingDest($tkey, $dest);
819                # Insure Tracer is specified.
820                my %moduleHash = map { $_ => 1 } @tracing;
821                $moduleHash{Tracer} = 1;
822                # Set the trace parameter.
823                $tracing = join(" ", $level, sort keys %moduleHash);
824            }
825        } elsif (defined $cgi) {
826            # There's no emergency tracing, but we have a CGI object, so check
827            # for tracing from the form parameters.
828            if ($cgi->param('Trace')) {
829                # Here the user has requested tracing via a form.
830                $dest = ($cgi->param('TF') ? ">$FIG_Config::temp/Trace$$.log" : "QUEUE");
831                $tracing = $cgi->param('Trace') . " Tracer";
832            }
833        }
834        # Setup the tracing we've determined from all the stuff above.
835        TSetup($tracing, $dest);
836        # Check to see if we're a web script.
837        if (defined $cgi) {
838            # Yes we are. Trace the form and environment data.
839            TraceParms($cgi);
840            # Check for RAW mode. In raw mode, we print a fake header so that we see everything
841            # emitted by the script in its raw form.
842            if (T(Raw => 3)) {
843                print CGI::header(-type => 'text/plain', -tracing => 'Raw');
844            }
845      }      }
     # Return the result.  
     return ($retVal, $pos, $len);  
846  }  }
847    
848  =head3 OpenDir  =head3 EmergencyFileName
849    
850  C<< my @files = OpenDir($dirName, $filtered, $flag); >>      my $fileName = Tracer::EmergencyFileName($tkey);
851    
852  Open a directory and return all the file names. This function essentially performs  Return the emergency tracing file name. This is the file that specifies
853  the functions of an C<opendir> and C<readdir>. If the I<$filtered> parameter is  the tracing information.
 set to TRUE, all filenames beginning with a period (C<.>), dollar sign (C<$>),  
 or pound sign (C<#>) and all filenames ending with a tilde C<~>) will be  
 filtered out of the return list. If the directory does not open and I<$flag> is not  
 set, an exception is thrown. So, for example,  
854    
855      my @files = OpenDir("/Volumes/fig/contigs", 1);  =over 4
856    
857  is effectively the same as  =item tkey
858    
859      opendir(TMP, "/Volumes/fig/contigs") || Confess("Could not open /Volumes/fig/contigs.");  Tracing key for the current program.
     my @files = grep { $_ !~ /^[\.\$\#]/ && $_ !~ /~$/ } readdir(TMP);  
860    
861  Similarly, the following code  =item RETURN
862    
863      my @files = grep { $_ =~ /^\d/ } OpenDir("/Volumes/fig/orgs", 0, 1);  Returns the name of the file to contain the emergency tracing information.
864    
865  Returns the names of all files in C</Volumes/fig/orgs> that begin with digits and  =back
866  automatically returns an empty list if the directory fails to open.  
867    =cut
868    
869    sub EmergencyFileName {
870        # Get the parameters.
871        my ($tkey) = @_;
872        # Compute the emergency tracing file name.
873        return "$FIG_Config::temp/Emergency$tkey.txt";
874    }
875    
876    =head3 EmergencyFileTarget
877    
878        my $fileName = Tracer::EmergencyFileTarget($tkey);
879    
880    Return the emergency tracing target file name. This is the file that receives
881    the tracing output for file-based tracing.
882    
883  =over 4  =over 4
884    
885  =item dirName  =item tkey
886    
887  Name of the directory to open.  Tracing key for the current program.
888    
889  =item filtered  =item RETURN
890    
891  TRUE if files whose names begin with a period (C<.>) should be automatically removed  Returns the name of the file to contain the trace output.
 from the list, else FALSE.  
892    
893  =item flag  =back
894    
895  TRUE if a failure to open is okay, else FALSE  =cut
896    
897    sub EmergencyFileTarget {
898        # Get the parameters.
899        my ($tkey) = @_;
900        # Compute the emergency tracing file name.
901        return "$FIG_Config::temp/trace$tkey.log";
902    }
903    
904    =head3 EmergencyTracingDest
905    
906        my $dest = Tracer::EmergencyTracingDest($tkey, $myDest);
907    
908    This method converts an emergency tracing destination to a real
909    tracing destination. The main difference is that if the
910    destination is C<FILE> or C<APPEND>, we convert it to file
911    output. If the destination is C<DUAL>, we convert it to file
912    and standard output.
913    
914    =over 4
915    
916    =item tkey
917    
918    Tracing key for this environment.
919    
920    =item myDest
921    
922    Destination from the emergency tracing file.
923    
924    =item RETURN
925    
926    Returns a destination that can be passed into L</TSetup>.
927    
928  =back  =back
929    
930  =cut  =cut
931  #: Return Type @;  
932  sub OpenDir {  sub EmergencyTracingDest {
933      # Get the parameters.      # Get the parameters.
934      my ($dirName, $filtered, $flag) = @_;      my ($tkey, $myDest) = @_;
935      # Declare the return variable.      # Declare the return variable.
936      my @retVal = ();      my $retVal = $myDest;
937      # Open the directory.      # Process according to the destination value.
938      if (opendir(my $dirHandle, $dirName)) {      if ($myDest eq 'FILE') {
939          # The directory opened successfully. Get the appropriate list according to the          $retVal = ">" . EmergencyFileTarget($tkey);
940          # strictures of the filter parameter.      } elsif ($myDest eq 'APPEND') {
941          if ($filtered) {          $retVal = ">>" . EmergencyFileTarget($tkey);
942              @retVal = grep { $_ !~ /^[\.\$\#]/ && $_ !~ /~$/ } readdir $dirHandle;      } elsif ($myDest eq 'DUAL') {
943          } else {          $retVal = "+>" . EmergencyFileTarget($tkey);
944              @retVal = readdir $dirHandle;      } elsif ($myDest eq 'WARN') {
945          }          $retVal = "WARN";
     } elsif (! $flag) {  
         # Here the directory would not open and it's considered an error.  
         Confess("Could not open directory $dirName.");  
946      }      }
947      # Return the result.      # Return the result.
948      return @retVal;      return $retVal;
949  }  }
950    
951  =head3 SetLevel  =head3 Emergency
952    
953  C<< Tracer::SetLevel($newLevel); >>      Emergency($key, $hours, $dest, $level, @modules);
954    
955  Modify the trace level. A higher trace level will cause more messages to appear.  Turn on emergency tracing. This method is normally invoked over the web from
956    a debugging console, but it can also be called by the C<trace.pl> script.
957    The caller specifies the duration of the emergency in hours, the desired tracing
958    destination, the trace level, and a list of the trace modules to activate.
959    For the length of the duration, when a program in an environment with the
960    specified tracing key active invokes a Sprout CGI script, tracing will be
961    turned on automatically. See L</TSetup> for more about tracing setup and
962    L</ETracing> for more about emergency tracing.
963    
964  =over 4  =over 4
965    
966  =item newLevel  =item tkey
967    
968  Proposed new trace level.  The tracing key. This is used to identify the control file and the trace file.
969    
970    =item hours
971    
972    Number of hours to keep emergency tracing alive.
973    
974    =item dest
975    
976    Tracing destination. If no path information is specified for a file
977    destination, it is put in the FIG temporary directory.
978    
979    =item level
980    
981    Tracing level. A higher level means more trace messages.
982    
983    =item modules
984    
985    A list of the tracing modules to activate.
986    
987  =back  =back
988    
989  =cut  =cut
990    
991  sub SetLevel {  sub Emergency {
992      $TraceLevel = $_[0];      # Get the parameters.
993        my ($tkey, $hours, $dest, $level, @modules) = @_;
994        # Create the emergency file.
995        my $specFile = EmergencyFileName($tkey);
996        my $outHandle = Open(undef, ">$specFile");
997        print $outHandle join("\n", $hours, $dest, $level, @modules, "");
998  }  }
999    
1000  =head3 Now  =head3 EmergencyKey
1001    
1002        my $tkey = EmergencyKey($parameter);
1003    
1004    Return the Key to be used for emergency tracing. This could be an IP address,
1005     a session ID, or a user name, depending on the environment.
1006    
1007  C<< my $string = Tracer::Now(); >>  =over 4
1008    
1009    =item parameter
1010    
1011    Parameter defining the method for finding the tracing key. If it is a scalar,
1012    then it is presumed to be the tracing key itself. If it is a CGI object, then
1013    the tracing key is taken from the C<IP> cookie. Otherwise, the tracing key is
1014    taken from the C<TRACING> environment variable.
1015    
1016    =item RETURN
1017    
1018    Returns the key to be used for labels in emergency tracing.
1019    
1020  Return a displayable time stamp containing the local time.  =back
1021    
1022  =cut  =cut
1023    
1024  sub Now {  sub EmergencyKey {
1025      my ($sec,$min,$hour,$mday,$mon,$year,$wday,$yday,$isdst) = localtime(time);      # Get the parameters.
1026      my $retVal = _p2($mon+1) . "/" . _p2($mday) . "/" . ($year + 1900) . " " .      my ($parameter) = @_;
1027                   _p2($hour) . ":" . _p2($min) . ":" . _p2($sec);      # Declare the return variable.
1028        my $retVal;
1029        # Determine the parameter type.
1030        if (! defined $parameter) {
1031            # Here we're supposed to check the environment.
1032            $retVal = $ENV{TRACING};
1033        } else {
1034            my $ptype = ref $parameter;
1035            if ($ptype eq 'CGI') {
1036                # Here we were invoked from a web page. Look for a cookie.
1037                $retVal = $parameter->cookie('IP');
1038            } elsif (! $ptype) {
1039                # Here the key was passed in.
1040                $retVal = $parameter;
1041            }
1042        }
1043        # If no luck finding a key, use the PID.
1044        if (! defined $retVal) {
1045            $retVal = $$;
1046        }
1047        # Return the result.
1048      return $retVal;      return $retVal;
1049  }  }
1050    
1051  # Pad a number to 2 digits.  
1052  sub _p2 {  =head3 TraceParms
1053      my ($value) = @_;  
1054      $value = "0$value" if ($value < 10);      Tracer::TraceParms($cgi);
1055      return $value;  
1056    Trace the CGI parameters at trace level CGI => 3 and the environment variables
1057    at level CGI => 4. A self-referencing URL is traced at level CGI => 2.
1058    
1059    =over 4
1060    
1061    =item cgi
1062    
1063    CGI query object containing the parameters to trace.
1064    
1065    =back
1066    
1067    =cut
1068    
1069    sub TraceParms {
1070        # Get the parameters.
1071        my ($cgi) = @_;
1072        if (T(CGI => 2)) {
1073            # Here we trace the GET-style URL for the script.
1074            Trace("[URL] " . $cgi->url(-relative => 1, -query => 1));
1075        }
1076        if (T(CGI => 3)) {
1077            # Here we want to trace the parameter data.
1078            my @names = $cgi->param;
1079            for my $parmName (sort @names) {
1080                # Note we skip the Trace parameters, which are for our use only.
1081                if ($parmName ne 'Trace' && $parmName ne 'TF') {
1082                    my @values = $cgi->param($parmName);
1083                    Trace("[CGI] $parmName = " . join(", ", @values));
1084                }
1085            }
1086            # Display the request method.
1087            my $method = $cgi->request_method();
1088            Trace("Method: $method");
1089        }
1090        if (T(CGI => 4)) {
1091            # Here we want the environment data too.
1092            for my $envName (sort keys %ENV) {
1093                Trace("[ENV] $envName = $ENV{$envName}");
1094            }
1095        }
1096    }
1097    
1098    =head3 TraceImages
1099    
1100        Tracer::TraceImages($htmlString);
1101    
1102    Trace information about all of an html document's images. The tracing
1103    will be for type "IMG" at level 3. The image's source string
1104    will be displayed. This is generally either the URL of the image or
1105    raw data for the image itself. If the source is too long, only the first 300
1106    characters will be shown at trace level 3. The entire source will be shown,
1107    however, at trace level 4. This method is not very smart, and might catch
1108    Javascript code, but it is still useful when debugging the arcane
1109    behavior of images in multiple browser environments.
1110    
1111    =over 4
1112    
1113    =item htmlString
1114    
1115    HTML text for an outgoing web page.
1116    
1117    =back
1118    
1119    =cut
1120    
1121    sub TraceImages {
1122        # Only proceed if we're at the proper trace level.
1123        if (T(IMG => 3)) {
1124            # For performance reasons we're manipulating $_[0] instead of retrieving the string
1125            # into a variable called "$htmlString". This is because we expect html strings to be
1126            # long, and don't want to copy them any more than we have to.
1127            Trace(length($_[0]) . " characters in web page.");
1128            # Loop through the HTML, culling image tags.
1129            while ($_[0] =~ /<img\s+[^>]+?src="([^"]+)"/sgi) {
1130                # Extract the source string and determine whether or not it's too long.
1131                my $srcString = $1;
1132                my $pos = pos($_[0]) - length($srcString);
1133                my $excess = length($srcString) - 300;
1134                # We'll put the display string in here.
1135                my $srcDisplay = $srcString;
1136                # If it's a data string, split it at the comma.
1137                $srcDisplay =~ s/^(data[^,]+,)/$1\n/;
1138                # If there's no excess or we're at trace level 4, we're done. At level 3 with
1139                # a long string, however, we only show the first 300 characters.
1140                if ($excess > 0 && ! T(IMG => 4)) {
1141                    $srcDisplay = substr($srcDisplay,0,300) . "\nplus $excess characters.";
1142                }
1143                # Output the trace message.
1144                Trace("Image tag at position $pos:\n$srcDisplay");
1145            }
1146        }
1147    }
1148    
1149    
1150    =head3 ScriptFinish (deprecated)
1151    
1152        ScriptFinish($webData, $varHash);
1153    
1154    Output a web page at the end of a script. Either the string to be output or the
1155    name of a template file can be specified. If the second parameter is omitted,
1156    it is assumed we have a string to be output; otherwise, it is assumed we have the
1157    name of a template file. The template should have the variable C<DebugData>
1158    specified in any form that invokes a standard script. If debugging mode is turned
1159    on, a form field will be put in that allows the user to enter tracing data.
1160    Trace messages will be placed immediately before the terminal C<BODY> tag in
1161    the output, formatted as a list.
1162    
1163    A typical standard script would loook like the following.
1164    
1165        BEGIN {
1166            # Print the HTML header.
1167            print "CONTENT-TYPE: text/html\n\n";
1168        }
1169        use Tracer;
1170        use CGI;
1171        use FIG;
1172        # ... more uses ...
1173    
1174        my ($cgi, $varHash) = ScriptSetup();
1175        eval {
1176            # ... get data from $cgi, put it in $varHash ...
1177        };
1178        if ($@) {
1179            Trace("Script Error: $@") if T(0);
1180        }
1181        ScriptFinish("Html/MyTemplate.html", $varHash);
1182    
1183    The idea here is that even if the script fails, you'll see trace messages and
1184    useful output.
1185    
1186    =over 4
1187    
1188    =item webData
1189    
1190    A string containing either the full web page to be written to the output or the
1191    name of a template file from which the page is to be constructed. If the name
1192    of a template file is specified, then the second parameter must be present;
1193    otherwise, it must be absent.
1194    
1195    =item varHash (optional)
1196    
1197    If specified, then a reference to a hash mapping variable names for a template
1198    to their values. The template file will be read into memory, and variable markers
1199    will be replaced by data in this hash reference.
1200    
1201    =back
1202    
1203    =cut
1204    
1205    sub ScriptFinish {
1206        # Get the parameters.
1207        my ($webData, $varHash) = @_;
1208        # Check for a template file situation.
1209        my $outputString;
1210        if (defined $varHash) {
1211            # Here we have a template file. We need to determine the template type.
1212            my $template;
1213            if ($FIG_Config::template_url && $webData =~ /\.php$/) {
1214                $template = "$FIG_Config::template_url/$webData";
1215            } else {
1216                $template = "<<$webData";
1217            }
1218            $outputString = PageBuilder::Build($template, $varHash, "Html");
1219        } else {
1220            # Here the user gave us a raw string.
1221            $outputString = $webData;
1222        }
1223        # Check for trace messages.
1224        if ($Destination ne "NONE" && $TraceLevel > 0) {
1225            # We have trace messages, so we want to put them at the end of the body. This
1226            # is either at the end of the whole string or at the beginning of the BODY
1227            # end-tag.
1228            my $pos = length $outputString;
1229            if ($outputString =~ m#</body>#gi) {
1230                $pos = (pos $outputString) - 7;
1231            }
1232            # If the trace messages were queued, we unroll them. Otherwise, we display the
1233            # destination.
1234            my $traceHtml;
1235            if ($Destination eq "QUEUE") {
1236                $traceHtml = QTrace('Html');
1237            } elsif ($Destination =~ /^>>(.+)$/) {
1238                # Here the tracing output it to a file. We code it as a hyperlink so the user
1239                # can copy the file name into the clipboard easily.
1240                my $actualDest = $1;
1241                $traceHtml = "<p>Tracing output to $actualDest.</p>\n";
1242            } else {
1243                # Here we have one of the special destinations.
1244                $traceHtml = "<P>Tracing output type is $Destination.</p>\n";
1245            }
1246            substr $outputString, $pos, 0, $traceHtml;
1247        }
1248        # Write the output string.
1249        print $outputString;
1250    }
1251    
1252    =head2 Command-Line Utility Methods
1253    
1254    =head3 SendSMS
1255    
1256        my $msgID = Tracer::SendSMS($phoneNumber, $msg);
1257    
1258    Send a text message to a phone number using Clickatell. The FIG_Config file must contain the
1259    user name, password, and API ID for the relevant account in the hash reference variable
1260    I<$FIG_Config::phone>, using the keys C<user>, C<password>, and C<api_id>. For
1261    example, if the user name is C<BruceTheHumanPet>, the password is C<silly>, and the API ID
1262    is C<2561022>, then the FIG_Config file must contain
1263    
1264        $phone =  { user => 'BruceTheHumanPet',
1265                    password => 'silly',
1266                    api_id => '2561022' };
1267    
1268    The original purpose of this method was to insure Bruce would be notified immediately when the
1269    Sprout Load terminates. Care should be taken if you do not wish Bruce to be notified immediately
1270    when you call this method.
1271    
1272    The message ID will be returned if successful, and C<undef> if an error occurs.
1273    
1274    =over 4
1275    
1276    =item phoneNumber
1277    
1278    Phone number to receive the message, in international format. A United States phone number
1279    would be prefixed by "1". A British phone number would be prefixed by "44".
1280    
1281    =item msg
1282    
1283    Message to send to the specified phone.
1284    
1285    =item RETURN
1286    
1287    Returns the message ID if successful, and C<undef> if the message could not be sent.
1288    
1289    =back
1290    
1291    =cut
1292    
1293    sub SendSMS {
1294        # Get the parameters.
1295        my ($phoneNumber, $msg) = @_;
1296        # Declare the return variable. If we do not change it, C<undef> will be returned.
1297        my $retVal;
1298        # Only proceed if we have phone support.
1299        if (! defined $FIG_Config::phone) {
1300            Trace("Phone support not present in FIG_Config.") if T(1);
1301        } else {
1302            # Get the phone data.
1303            my $parms = $FIG_Config::phone;
1304            # Get the Clickatell URL.
1305            my $url = "http://api.clickatell.com/http/";
1306            # Create the user agent.
1307            my $ua = LWP::UserAgent->new;
1308            # Request a Clickatell session.
1309            my $resp = $ua->post("$url/sendmsg", { user => $parms->{user},
1310                                         password => $parms->{password},
1311                                         api_id => $parms->{api_id},
1312                                         to => $phoneNumber,
1313                                         text => $msg});
1314            # Check for an error.
1315            if (! $resp->is_success) {
1316                Trace("Alert failed.") if T(1);
1317            } else {
1318                # Get the message ID.
1319                my $rstring = $resp->content;
1320                if ($rstring =~ /^ID:\s+(.*)$/) {
1321                    $retVal = $1;
1322                } else {
1323                    Trace("Phone attempt failed with $rstring") if T(1);
1324                }
1325            }
1326        }
1327        # Return the result.
1328        return $retVal;
1329    }
1330    
1331    =head3 StandardSetup
1332    
1333        my ($options, @parameters) = StandardSetup(\@categories, \%options, $parmHelp, @ARGV);
1334    
1335    This method performs standard command-line parsing and tracing setup. The return
1336    values are a hash of the command-line options and a list of the positional
1337    parameters. Tracing is automatically set up and the command-line options are
1338    validated.
1339    
1340    This is a complex method that does a lot of grunt work. The parameters can
1341    be more easily understood, however, once they are examined individually.
1342    
1343    The I<categories> parameter is the most obtuse. It is a reference to a list of
1344    special-purpose tracing categories. Most tracing categories are PERL package
1345    names. So, for example, if you wanted to turn on tracing inside the B<Sprout>,
1346    B<ERDB>, and B<SproutLoad> packages, you would specify the categories
1347    
1348        ["Sprout", "SproutLoad", "ERDB"]
1349    
1350    This would cause trace messages in the specified three packages to appear in
1351    the output. There are two special tracing categories that are automatically
1352    handled by this method. In other words, if you used L</TSetup> you would need
1353    to include these categories manually, but if you use this method they are turned
1354    on automatically.
1355    
1356    =over 4
1357    
1358    =item SQL
1359    
1360    Traces SQL commands and activity.
1361    
1362    =item Tracer
1363    
1364    Traces error messages and call stacks.
1365    
1366    =back
1367    
1368    C<SQL> is only turned on if the C<-sql> option is specified in the command line.
1369    The trace level is specified using the C<-trace> command-line option. For example,
1370    the following command line for C<TransactFeatures> turns on SQL tracing and runs
1371    all tracing at level 3.
1372    
1373        TransactFeatures -trace=3 -sql register ../xacts IDs.tbl
1374    
1375    Standard tracing is output to the standard output and echoed to the file
1376    C<trace>I<$$>C<.log> in the FIG temporary directory, where I<$$> is the
1377    process ID. You can also specify the C<user> parameter to put a user ID
1378    instead of a process ID in the trace file name. So, for example
1379    
1380    The default trace level is 2. To get all messages, specify a trace level of 4.
1381    For a genome-by-genome update, use 3.
1382    
1383        TransactFeatures -trace=3 -sql -user=Bruce register ../xacts IDs.tbl
1384    
1385    would send the trace output to C<traceBruce.log> in the temporary directory.
1386    
1387    The I<options> parameter is a reference to a hash containing the command-line
1388    options, their default values, and an explanation of what they mean. Command-line
1389    options may be in the form of switches or keywords. In the case of a switch, the
1390    option value is 1 if it is specified and 0 if it is not specified. In the case
1391    of a keyword, the value is separated from the option name by an equal sign. You
1392    can see this last in the command-line example above.
1393    
1394    You can specify a different default trace level by setting C<$options->{trace}>
1395    prior to calling this method.
1396    
1397    An example at this point would help. Consider, for example, the command-line utility
1398    C<TransactFeatures>. It accepts a list of positional parameters plus the options
1399    C<safe>, C<noAlias>, C<start>, and C<tblFiles>. To start up this command, we execute
1400    the following code.
1401    
1402        my ($options, @parameters) = Tracer::StandardSetup(["DocUtils"],
1403                            { safe => [0, "use database transactions"],
1404                              noAlias => [0, "do not expect aliases in CHANGE transactions"],
1405                              start => [' ', "start with this genome"],
1406                              tblFiles => [0, "output TBL files containing the corrected IDs"] },
1407                            "<command> <transactionDirectory> <IDfile>",
1408                          @ARGV);
1409    
1410    
1411    The call to C<ParseCommand> specifies the default values for the options and
1412    stores the actual options in a hash that is returned as C<$options>. The
1413    positional parameters are returned in C<@parameters>.
1414    
1415    The following is a sample command line for C<TransactFeatures>.
1416    
1417        TransactFeatures -trace=2 -noAlias register ../xacts IDs.tbl
1418    
1419    Single and double hyphens are equivalent. So, you could also code the
1420    above command as
1421    
1422        TransactFeatures --trace=2 --noAlias register ../xacts IDs.tbl
1423    
1424    In this case, C<register>, C<../xacts>, and C<IDs.tbl> are the positional
1425    parameters, and would find themselves in I<@parameters> after executing the
1426    above code fragment. The tracing would be set to level 2, and the categories
1427    would be C<Tracer>, and <DocUtils>. C<Tracer> is standard,
1428    and C<DocUtils> was included because it came in within the first parameter
1429    to this method. The I<$options> hash would be
1430    
1431        { trace => 2, sql => 0, safe => 0,
1432          noAlias => 1, start => ' ', tblFiles => 0 }
1433    
1434    Use of C<StandardSetup> in this way provides a simple way of performing
1435    standard tracing setup and command-line parsing. Note that the caller is
1436    not even aware of the command-line switches C<-trace> and C<-sql>, which
1437    are used by this method to control the tracing. If additional tracing features
1438    need to be added in the future, they can be processed by this method without
1439    upsetting the command-line utilities.
1440    
1441    If the C<background> option is specified on the command line, then the
1442    standard and error outputs will be directed to files in the temporary
1443    directory, using the same suffix as the trace file. So, if the command
1444    line specified
1445    
1446        -user=Bruce -background
1447    
1448    then the trace output would go to C<traceBruce.log>, the standard output to
1449    C<outBruce.log>, and the error output to C<errBruce.log>. This is designed to
1450    simplify starting a command in the background.
1451    
1452    The user name is also used as the tracing key for L</Emergency Tracing>.
1453    Specifying a value of C<E> for the trace level causes emergency tracing to
1454    be used instead of custom tracing. If the user name is not specified,
1455    the tracing key is taken from the C<Tracing> environment variable. If there
1456    is no value for that variable, the tracing key will be computed from the PID.
1457    
1458    Finally, if the special option C<-help> is specified, the option
1459    names will be traced at level 0 and the program will exit without processing.
1460    This provides a limited help capability. For example, if the user enters
1461    
1462        TransactFeatures -help
1463    
1464    he would see the following output.
1465    
1466        TransactFeatures [options] <command> <transactionDirectory> <IDfile>
1467            -trace    tracing level (default E)
1468            -sql      trace SQL commands
1469            -safe     use database transactions
1470            -noAlias  do not expect aliases in CHANGE transactions
1471            -start    start with this genome
1472            -tblFiles output TBL files containing the corrected IDs
1473    
1474    The caller has the option of modifying the tracing scheme by placing a value
1475    for C<trace> in the incoming options hash. The default value can be overridden,
1476    or the tracing to the standard output can be turned off by suffixing a minus
1477    sign to the trace level. So, for example,
1478    
1479        { trace => [0, "tracing level (default 0)"],
1480           ...
1481    
1482    would set the default trace level to 0 instead of E, while
1483    
1484        { trace => ["2-", "tracing level (default 2)"],
1485           ...
1486    
1487    would set the default to 2, but trace only to the log file, not to the
1488    standard output.
1489    
1490    The parameters to this method are as follows.
1491    
1492    =over 4
1493    
1494    =item categories
1495    
1496    Reference to a list of tracing category names. These should be names of
1497    packages whose internal workings will need to be debugged to get the
1498    command working.
1499    
1500    =item options
1501    
1502    Reference to a hash containing the legal options for the current command mapped
1503    to their default values and descriptions. The user can override the defaults
1504    by specifying the options as command-line switches prefixed by a hyphen.
1505    Tracing-related options may be added to this hash. If the C<-h> option is
1506    specified on the command line, the option descriptions will be used to
1507    explain the options. To turn off tracing to the standard output, add a
1508    minus sign to the value for C<trace> (see above).
1509    
1510    =item parmHelp
1511    
1512    A string that vaguely describes the positional parameters. This is used
1513    if the user specifies the C<-h> option.
1514    
1515    =item argv
1516    
1517    List of command line parameters, including the option switches, which must
1518    precede the positional parameters and be prefixed by a hyphen.
1519    
1520    =item RETURN
1521    
1522    Returns a list. The first element of the list is the reference to a hash that
1523    maps the command-line option switches to their values. These will either be the
1524    default values or overrides specified on the command line. The remaining
1525    elements of the list are the position parameters, in order.
1526    
1527    =back
1528    
1529    =cut
1530    
1531    sub StandardSetup {
1532        # Get the parameters.
1533        my ($categories, $options, $parmHelp, @argv) = @_;
1534        # Get the default tracing key.
1535        my $tkey = EmergencyKey();
1536        # Add the tracing options.
1537        if (! exists $options->{trace}) {
1538            $options->{trace} = ['2', "tracing level (E for emergency tracing)"];
1539        }
1540        $options->{sql} = [0, "turn on SQL tracing"];
1541        $options->{help} = [0, "display command-line options"];
1542        $options->{user} = [$tkey, "tracing key"];
1543        $options->{background} = [0, "spool standard and error output"];
1544        # Create a parsing hash from the options hash. The parsing hash
1545        # contains the default values rather than the default value
1546        # and the description. While we're at it, we'll memorize the
1547        # length of the longest option name.
1548        my $longestName = 0;
1549        my %parseOptions = ();
1550        for my $key (keys %{$options}) {
1551            if (length $key > $longestName) {
1552                $longestName = length $key;
1553            }
1554            $parseOptions{$key} = $options->{$key}->[0];
1555        }
1556        # Parse the command line.
1557        my ($retOptions, @retParameters) = ParseCommand(\%parseOptions, @argv);
1558        # Get the logfile suffix.
1559        my $suffix = $retOptions->{user};
1560        # Check for background mode.
1561        if ($retOptions->{background}) {
1562            my $outFileName = "$FIG_Config::temp/out$suffix.log";
1563            my $errFileName = "$FIG_Config::temp/err$suffix.log";
1564            open STDOUT, ">$outFileName";
1565            open STDERR, ">$errFileName";
1566            # Check for phone support. If we have phone support and a phone number,
1567            # we want to turn it on.
1568            if ($ENV{PHONE} && defined($FIG_Config::phone)) {
1569                $retOptions->{phone} = $ENV{PHONE};
1570            }
1571        }
1572        # Now we want to set up tracing. First, we need to know if the user
1573        # wants emergency tracing.
1574        if ($retOptions->{trace} eq 'E') {
1575            ETracing($retOptions->{user});
1576        } else {
1577            # Here the tracing is controlled from the command line.
1578            my @cats = @{$categories};
1579            if ($retOptions->{sql}) {
1580                push @cats, "SQL";
1581            }
1582            # Add the default categories.
1583            push @cats, "Tracer";
1584            # Next, we create the category string by joining the categories.
1585            my $cats = join(" ", @cats);
1586            # Check to determine whether or not the caller wants to turn off tracing
1587            # to the standard output.
1588            my $traceLevel = $retOptions->{trace};
1589            my $textOKFlag = 1;
1590            if ($traceLevel =~ /^(.)-/) {
1591                $traceLevel = $1;
1592                $textOKFlag = 0;
1593            }
1594            # Now we set up the trace mode.
1595            my $traceMode;
1596            # Verify that we can open a file in the FIG temporary directory.
1597            my $traceFileName = "$FIG_Config::temp/trace$suffix.log";
1598            if (open TESTTRACE, ">$traceFileName") {
1599                # Here we can trace to a file.
1600                $traceMode = ">$traceFileName";
1601                if ($textOKFlag) {
1602                    # Echo to standard output if the text-OK flag is set.
1603                    $traceMode = "+$traceMode";
1604                }
1605                # Close the test file.
1606                close TESTTRACE;
1607            } else {
1608                # Here we can't trace to a file. We trace to the standard output if it's
1609                # okay, and the error log otherwise.
1610                if ($textOKFlag) {
1611                    $traceMode = "TEXT";
1612                } else {
1613                    $traceMode = "WARN";
1614                }
1615            }
1616            # Now set up the tracing.
1617            TSetup("$traceLevel $cats", $traceMode);
1618        }
1619        # Check for the "help" option. If it is specified, dump the command-line
1620        # options and exit the program.
1621        if ($retOptions->{help}) {
1622            $0 =~ m#[/\\](\w+)(\.pl)?$#i;
1623            print "$1 [options] $parmHelp\n";
1624            for my $key (sort keys %{$options}) {
1625                my $name = Pad($key, $longestName, 0, ' ');
1626                my $desc = $options->{$key}->[1];
1627                if ($options->{$key}->[0]) {
1628                    $desc .= " (default " . $options->{$key}->[0] . ")";
1629                }
1630                print "  $name $desc\n";
1631  }  }
1632            exit(0);
1633  =head3 LogErrors      }
1634        # Trace the options, if applicable.
1635  C<< Tracer::LogErrors($fileName); >>      if (T(3)) {
1636            my @parms = grep { $retOptions->{$_} } keys %{$retOptions};
1637  Route the standard error output to a log file.          Trace("Selected options: " . join(", ", sort @parms) . ".");
1638        }
1639  =over 4      # Return the parsed parameters.
1640        return ($retOptions, @retParameters);
 =item fileName  
   
 Name of the file to receive the error output.  
   
 =back  
   
 =cut  
   
 sub LogErrors {  
     # Get the file name.  
     my ($fileName) = @_;  
     # Open the file as the standard error output.  
     open STDERR, '>', $fileName;  
1641  }  }
1642    
1643  =head3 ReadOptions  =head3 ReadOptions
1644    
1645  C<< my %options = Tracer::ReadOptions($fileName); >>      my %options = Tracer::ReadOptions($fileName);
1646    
1647  Read a set of options from a file. Each option is encoded in a line of text that has the  Read a set of options from a file. Each option is encoded in a line of text that has the
1648  format  format
# Line 853  Line 1703 
1703    
1704  =head3 GetOptions  =head3 GetOptions
1705    
1706  C<< Tracer::GetOptions(\%defaults, \%options); >>      Tracer::GetOptions(\%defaults, \%options);
1707    
1708  Merge a specified set of options into a table of defaults. This method takes two hash references  Merge a specified set of options into a table of defaults. This method takes two hash references
1709  as input and uses the data from the second to update the first. If the second does not exist,  as input and uses the data from the second to update the first. If the second does not exist,
# Line 862  Line 1712 
1712    
1713  Consider the following example.  Consider the following example.
1714    
1715  C<< my $optionTable = GetOptions({ dbType => 'mySQL', trace => 0 }, $options); >>      my $optionTable = GetOptions({ dbType => 'mySQL', trace => 0 }, $options);
1716    
1717  In this example, the variable B<$options> is expected to contain at most two options-- B<dbType> and  In this example, the variable B<$options> is expected to contain at most two options-- B<dbType> and
1718  B<trace>. The default database type is C<mySQL> and the default trace level is C<0>. If the value of  B<trace>. The default database type is C<mySQL> and the default trace level is C<0>. If the value of
# Line 870  Line 1720 
1720  the trace level will remain at 0. If B<$options> is undefined, then the database type and trace level  the trace level will remain at 0. If B<$options> is undefined, then the database type and trace level
1721  will remain C<mySQL> and C<0>. If, on the other hand, B<$options> is defined as  will remain C<mySQL> and C<0>. If, on the other hand, B<$options> is defined as
1722    
1723  C<< {databaseType => 'Oracle'} >>      {databaseType => 'Oracle'}
1724    
1725  an error will occur because the B<databaseType> option does not exist.  an error will occur because the B<databaseType> option does not exist.
1726    
# Line 914  Line 1764 
1764    
1765  =head3 MergeOptions  =head3 MergeOptions
1766    
1767  C<< Tracer::MergeOptions(\%table, \%defaults); >>      Tracer::MergeOptions(\%table, \%defaults);
1768    
1769  Merge default values into a hash table. This method looks at the key-value pairs in the  Merge default values into a hash table. This method looks at the key-value pairs in the
1770  second (default) hash, and if a matching key is not found in the first hash, the default  second (default) hash, and if a matching key is not found in the first hash, the default
# Line 946  Line 1796 
1796      }      }
1797  }  }
1798    
1799  =head3 Trace  =head3 ParseCommand
1800    
1801        my ($options, @arguments) = Tracer::ParseCommand(\%optionTable, @inputList);
1802    
1803    Parse a command line consisting of a list of parameters. The initial parameters may be option
1804    specifiers of the form C<->I<option> or C<->I<option>C<=>I<value>. The options are stripped
1805    off and merged into a table of default options. The remainder of the command line is
1806    returned as a list of positional arguments. For example, consider the following invocation.
1807    
1808        my ($options, @arguments) = ParseCommand({ errors => 0, logFile => 'trace.log'}, @words);
1809    
1810    In this case, the list @words will be treated as a command line and there are two options available,
1811    B<errors> and B<logFile>. If @words has the following format
1812    
1813        -logFile=error.log apple orange rutabaga
1814    
1815    then at the end of the invocation, C<$options> will be
1816    
1817        { errors => 0, logFile => 'error.log' }
1818    
1819    and C<@arguments> will contain
1820    
1821        apple orange rutabaga
1822    
1823    The parser allows for some escape sequences. See L</UnEscape> for a description. There is no
1824    support for quote characters. Options can be specified with single or double hyphens.
1825    
1826    =over 4
1827    
1828    =item optionTable
1829    
1830    Table of default options.
1831    
1832    =item inputList
1833    
1834    List of words on the command line.
1835    
1836    =item RETURN
1837    
1838    Returns a reference to the option table and a list of the positional arguments.
1839    
1840    =back
1841    
1842    =cut
1843    
1844    sub ParseCommand {
1845        # Get the parameters.
1846        my ($optionTable, @inputList) = @_;
1847        # Process any options in the input list.
1848        my %overrides = ();
1849        while ((@inputList > 0) && ($inputList[0] =~ /^--?/)) {
1850            # Get the current option.
1851            my $arg = shift @inputList;
1852            # Pull out the option name.
1853            $arg =~ /^--?([^=]*)/g;
1854            my $name = $1;
1855            # Check for an option value.
1856            if ($arg =~ /\G=(.*)$/g) {
1857                # Here we have a value for the option.
1858                $overrides{$name} = UnEscape($1);
1859            } else {
1860                # Here there is no value, so we use 1.
1861                $overrides{$name} = 1;
1862            }
1863        }
1864        # Merge the options into the defaults.
1865        GetOptions($optionTable, \%overrides);
1866        # Translate the remaining parameters.
1867        my @retVal = ();
1868        for my $inputParm (@inputList) {
1869            push @retVal, UnEscape($inputParm);
1870        }
1871        # Return the results.
1872        return ($optionTable, @retVal);
1873    }
1874    
1875    
1876    =head2 File Utility Methods
1877    
1878    =head3 GetFile
1879    
1880        my @fileContents = Tracer::GetFile($fileName);
1881    
1882        or
1883    
1884        my $fileContents = Tracer::GetFile($fileName);
1885    
1886    Return the entire contents of a file. In list context, line-ends are removed and
1887    each line is a list element. In scalar context, line-ends are replaced by C<\n>.
1888    
1889    =over 4
1890    
1891    =item fileName
1892    
1893    Name of the file to read.
1894    
1895    =item RETURN
1896    
1897    In a list context, returns the entire file as a list with the line terminators removed.
1898    In a scalar context, returns the entire file as a string. If an error occurs opening
1899    the file, an empty list will be returned.
1900    
1901    =back
1902    
1903    =cut
1904    
1905    sub GetFile {
1906        # Get the parameters.
1907        my ($fileName) = @_;
1908        # Declare the return variable.
1909        my @retVal = ();
1910        # Open the file for input.
1911        my $handle = Open(undef, "<$fileName");
1912        # Read the whole file into the return variable, stripping off any terminator
1913        # characters.
1914        my $lineCount = 0;
1915        while (my $line = <$handle>) {
1916            $lineCount++;
1917            $line = Strip($line);
1918            push @retVal, $line;
1919        }
1920        # Close it.
1921        close $handle;
1922        my $actualLines = @retVal;
1923        Trace("$actualLines lines read from file $fileName.") if T(File => 2);
1924        # Return the file's contents in the desired format.
1925        if (wantarray) {
1926            return @retVal;
1927        } else {
1928            return join "\n", @retVal;
1929        }
1930    }
1931    
1932    =head3 PutFile
1933    
1934        Tracer::PutFile($fileName, \@lines);
1935    
1936    Write out a file from a list of lines of text.
1937    
1938    =over 4
1939    
1940    =item fileName
1941    
1942    Name of the output file.
1943    
1944    =item lines
1945    
1946    Reference to a list of text lines. The lines will be written to the file in order, with trailing
1947    new-line characters. Alternatively, may be a string, in which case the string will be written without
1948    modification.
1949    
1950    =back
1951    
1952    =cut
1953    
1954    sub PutFile {
1955        # Get the parameters.
1956        my ($fileName, $lines) = @_;
1957        # Open the output file.
1958        my $handle = Open(undef, ">$fileName");
1959        # Count the lines written.
1960        if (ref $lines ne 'ARRAY') {
1961            # Here we have a scalar, so we write it raw.
1962            print $handle $lines;
1963            Trace("Scalar put to file $fileName.") if T(File => 3);
1964        } else {
1965            # Write the lines one at a time.
1966            my $count = 0;
1967            for my $line (@{$lines}) {
1968                print $handle "$line\n";
1969                $count++;
1970            }
1971            Trace("$count lines put to file $fileName.") if T(File => 3);
1972        }
1973        # Close the output file.
1974        close $handle;
1975    }
1976    
1977    =head3 ParseRecord
1978    
1979        my @fields = Tracer::ParseRecord($line);
1980    
1981    Parse a tab-delimited data line. The data line is split into field values. Embedded tab
1982    and new-line characters in the data line must be represented as C<\t> and C<\n>, respectively.
1983    These will automatically be converted.
1984    
1985    =over 4
1986    
1987    =item line
1988    
1989    Line of data containing the tab-delimited fields.
1990    
1991    =item RETURN
1992    
1993    Returns a list of the fields found in the data line.
1994    
1995    =back
1996    
1997    =cut
1998    
1999    sub ParseRecord {
2000        # Get the parameter.
2001        my ($line) = @_;
2002        # Remove the trailing new-line, if any.
2003        chomp $line;
2004        # Split the line read into pieces using the tab character.
2005        my @retVal = split /\t/, $line;
2006        # Trim and fix the escapes in each piece.
2007        for my $value (@retVal) {
2008            # Trim leading whitespace.
2009            $value =~ s/^\s+//;
2010            # Trim trailing whitespace.
2011            $value =~ s/\s+$//;
2012            # Delete the carriage returns.
2013            $value =~ s/\r//g;
2014            # Convert the escapes into their real values.
2015            $value =~ s/\\t/"\t"/ge;
2016            $value =~ s/\\n/"\n"/ge;
2017        }
2018        # Return the result.
2019        return @retVal;
2020    }
2021    
2022    =head3 Merge
2023    
2024        my @mergedList = Tracer::Merge(@inputList);
2025    
2026    Sort a list of strings and remove duplicates.
2027    
2028    =over 4
2029    
2030    =item inputList
2031    
2032    List of scalars to sort and merge.
2033    
2034    =item RETURN
2035    
2036    Returns a list containing the same elements sorted in ascending order with duplicates
2037    removed.
2038    
2039    =back
2040    
2041    =cut
2042    
2043    sub Merge {
2044        # Get the input list in sort order.
2045        my @inputList = sort @_;
2046        # Only proceed if the list has at least two elements.
2047        if (@inputList > 1) {
2048            # Now we want to move through the list splicing out duplicates.
2049            my $i = 0;
2050            while ($i < @inputList) {
2051                # Get the current entry.
2052                my $thisEntry = $inputList[$i];
2053                # Find out how many elements duplicate the current entry.
2054                my $j = $i + 1;
2055                my $dup1 = $i + 1;
2056                while ($j < @inputList && $inputList[$j] eq $thisEntry) { $j++; };
2057                # If the number is nonzero, splice out the duplicates found.
2058                if ($j > $dup1) {
2059                    splice @inputList, $dup1, $j - $dup1;
2060                }
2061                # Now the element at position $dup1 is different from the element before it
2062                # at position $i. We push $i forward one position and start again.
2063                $i++;
2064            }
2065        }
2066        # Return the merged list.
2067        return @inputList;
2068    }
2069    
2070    =head3 Open
2071    
2072  C<< Trace($message); >>      my $handle = Open($fileHandle, $fileSpec, $message);
2073    
2074  Write a trace message to the target location specified in L</TSetup>. If there has not been  Open a file.
 any prior call to B<TSetup>.  
2075    
2076  =over 4  The I<$fileSpec> is essentially the second argument of the PERL C<open>
2077    function. The mode is specified using Unix-like shell information. So, for
2078    example,
2079    
2080  =item message      Open(\*LOGFILE, '>>/usr/spool/news/twitlog', "Could not open twit log.");
2081    
2082  Message to write.  would open for output appended to the specified file, and
2083    
2084  =back      Open(\*DATASTREAM, "| sort -u >$outputFile", "Could not open $outputFile.");
2085    
2086  =cut  would open a pipe that sorts the records written and removes duplicates. Note
2087    the use of file handle syntax in the Open call. To use anonymous file handles,
2088    code as follows.
2089    
2090  sub Trace {      my $logFile = Open(undef, '>>/usr/spool/news/twitlog', "Could not open twit log.");
     # Get the parameters.  
     my ($message) = @_;  
     # Get the timestamp.  
     my $timeStamp = Now();  
     # Format the message. Note we strip off any line terminators at the end.  
     my $formatted = "$timeStamp <$LastCategory>: " . Strip($message);  
     # Process according to the destination.  
     if ($Destination eq "TEXT") {  
         # Write the message to the standard output.  
         print "$formatted\n";  
     } elsif ($Destination eq "ERROR") {  
         # Write the message to the error output.  
         print STDERR "$formatted\n";  
     } elsif ($Destination eq "QUEUE") {  
         # Push the message into the queue.  
         push @Queue, "$formatted";  
     } elsif ($Destination eq "HTML") {  
         # Convert the message to HTML and write it to the standard output.  
         my $escapedMessage = CGI::escapeHTML($message);  
         print "<p>$formatted</p>\n";  
     } elsif ($Destination eq "WARN") {  
        # Emit the message as a warning.  
        warn $message;  
     } elsif ($Destination =~ m/^>>/) {  
         # Write the trace message to an output file.  
         (open TRACING, $Destination) || die "Tracing open for \"$Destination\" failed: $!";  
         print TRACING "$formatted\n";  
         close TRACING;  
         # If the Tee flag is on, echo it to the standard output.  
         if ($TeeFlag) {  
             print "$formatted\n";  
         }  
     }  
 }  
2091    
2092  =head3 T  The I<$message> parameter is used if the open fails. If it is set to C<0>, then
2093    the open returns TRUE if successful and FALSE if an error occurred. Otherwise, a
2094    failed open will throw an exception and the third parameter will be used to construct
2095    an error message. If the parameter is omitted, a standard message is constructed
2096    using the file spec.
2097    
2098  C<< my $switch = T($category, $traceLevel); >>      Could not open "/usr/spool/news/twitlog"
2099    
2100      or  Note that the mode characters are automatically cleaned from the file name.
2101    The actual error message from the file system will be captured and appended to the
2102    message in any case.
2103    
2104  C<< my $switch = T($traceLevel); >>      Could not open "/usr/spool/news/twitlog": file not found.
2105    
2106  Return TRUE if the trace level is at or above a specified value and the specified category  In some versions of PERL the only error message we get is a number, which
2107  is active, else FALSE. If no category is specified, the caller's package name is used.  corresponds to the C++ C<errno> value.
2108    
2109        Could not open "/usr/spool/news/twitlog": 6.
2110    
2111  =over 4  =over 4
2112    
2113  =item category  =item fileHandle
2114    
2115  Category to which the message belongs. If not specified, the caller's package name is  File handle. If this parameter is C<undef>, a file handle will be generated
2116  used.  and returned as the value of this method.
2117    
2118  =item traceLevel  =item fileSpec
2119    
2120  Relevant tracing level.  File name and mode, as per the PERL C<open> function.
2121    
2122    =item message (optional)
2123    
2124    Error message to use if the open fails. If omitted, a standard error message
2125    will be generated. In either case, the error information from the file system
2126    is appended to the message. To specify a conditional open that does not throw
2127    an error if it fails, use C<0>.
2128    
2129  =item RETURN  =item RETURN
2130    
2131  TRUE if a message at the specified trace level would appear in the trace, else FALSE.  Returns the name of the file handle assigned to the file, or C<undef> if the
2132    open failed.
2133    
2134  =back  =back
2135    
2136  =cut  =cut
2137    
2138  sub T {  sub Open {
     # Declare the return variable.  
     my $retVal = 0;  
     # Only proceed if tracing is turned on.  
     if ($Destination ne "NONE") {  
2139          # Get the parameters.          # Get the parameters.
2140          my ($category, $traceLevel) = @_;      my ($fileHandle, $fileSpec, $message) = @_;
2141          if (!defined $traceLevel) {      # Attempt to open the file.
2142              # Here we have no category, so we need to get the calling package.      my $rv = open $fileHandle, $fileSpec;
2143              # The calling package is normally the first parameter. If it is      # If the open failed, generate an error message.
2144              # omitted, the first parameter will be the tracelevel. So, the      if (! $rv) {
2145              # first thing we do is shift the so-called category into the          # Save the system error message.
2146              # $traceLevel variable where it belongs.          my $sysMessage = $!;
2147              $traceLevel = $category;          # See if we need a default message.
2148              my ($package, $fileName, $line) = caller;          if (!$message) {
2149              # If there is no calling package, we default to "main".              # Clean any obvious mode characters and leading spaces from the
2150              if (!$package) {              # filename.
2151                  $category = "main";              my ($fileName) = FindNamePart($fileSpec);
2152              } else {              $message = "Could not open \"$fileName\"";
                 $category = $package;  
             }  
         }  
         # Save the category name.  
         $LastCategory = $category;  
         # Convert it to lower case before we hash it.  
         $category = lc $category;  
         # Use the category and tracelevel to compute the result.  
         if (ref $traceLevel) {  
             Confess("Bad trace level.");  
         } elsif (ref $TraceLevel) {  
             Confess("Bad trace config.");  
2153          }          }
2154          $retVal = ($traceLevel <= $TraceLevel && ($AllTrace || exists $Categories{$category}));          # Terminate with an error using the supplied message and the
2155            # error message from the file system.
2156            Confess("$message: $!");
2157      }      }
2158      # Return the computed result.      # Return the file handle.
2159      return $retVal;      return $fileHandle;
2160  }  }
2161    
2162  =head3 ParseCommand  =head3 FindNamePart
   
 C<< my ($options, @arguments) = Tracer::ParseCommand(\%optionTable, @inputList); >>  
   
 Parse a command line consisting of a list of parameters. The initial parameters may be option  
 specifiers of the form C<->I<option> or C<->I<option>C<=>I<value>. The options are stripped  
 off and merged into a table of default options. The remainder of the command line is  
 returned as a list of positional arguments. For example, consider the following invocation.  
   
 C<< my ($options, @arguments) = ParseCommand({ errors => 0, logFile => 'trace.log'}, @words); >>  
   
 In this case, the list @words will be treated as a command line. There are two options available,  
 B<errors> and B<logFile>. If @words has the following format  
   
 C<< -logFile=error.log apple orange rutabaga >>  
2163    
2164  then at the end of the invocation, C<$options> will be      my ($fileName, $start, $len) = Tracer::FindNamePart($fileSpec);
2165    
2166  C<< { errors => 0, logFile => 'error.log' } >>  Extract the portion of a file specification that contains the file name.
2167    
2168  and C<@arguments> will contain  A file specification is the string passed to an C<open> call. It specifies the file
2169    mode and name. In a truly complex situation, it can specify a pipe sequence. This
2170    method assumes that the file name is whatever follows the first angle bracket
2171    sequence.  So, for example, in the following strings the file name is
2172    C</usr/fig/myfile.txt>.
2173    
2174  C<< apple orange rutabaga >>      >>/usr/fig/myfile.txt
2175        </usr/fig/myfile.txt
2176        | sort -u > /usr/fig/myfile.txt
2177    
2178  The parser allows for some escape sequences. See L</UnEscape> for a description. There is no  If the method cannot find a file name using its normal methods, it will return the
2179  support for quote characters.  whole incoming string.
2180    
2181  =over 4  =over 4
2182    
2183  =item optionTable  =item fileSpec
   
 Table of default options.  
   
 =item inputList  
2184    
2185  List of words on the command line.  File specification string from which the file name is to be extracted.
2186    
2187  =item RETURN  =item RETURN
2188    
2189  Returns a reference to the option table and a list of the positional arguments.  Returns a three-element list. The first element contains the file name portion of
2190    the specified string, or the whole string if a file name cannot be found via normal
2191    methods. The second element contains the start position of the file name portion and
2192    the third element contains the length.
2193    
2194  =back  =back
2195    
2196  =cut  =cut
2197    #: Return Type $;
2198  sub ParseCommand {  sub FindNamePart {
2199      # Get the parameters.      # Get the parameters.
2200      my ($optionTable, @inputList) = @_;      my ($fileSpec) = @_;
2201      # Process any options in the input list.      # Default to the whole input string.
2202      my %overrides = ();      my ($retVal, $pos, $len) = ($fileSpec, 0, length $fileSpec);
2203      while ((@inputList > 0) && ($inputList[0] =~ /^-/)) {      # Parse out the file name if we can.
2204          # Get the current option.      if ($fileSpec =~ m/(<|>>?)(.+?)(\s*)$/) {
2205          my $arg = shift @inputList;          $retVal = $2;
2206          # Pull out the option name.          $len = length $retVal;
2207          $arg =~ /^-([^=]*)/g;          $pos = (length $fileSpec) - (length $3) - $len;
         my $name = $1;  
         # Check for an option value.  
         if ($arg =~ /\G=(.*)$/g) {  
             # Here we have a value for the option.  
             $overrides{$name} = UnEscape($1);  
         } else {  
             # Here there is no value, so we use 1.  
             $overrides{$name} = 1;  
         }  
     }  
     # Merge the options into the defaults.  
     GetOptions($optionTable, \%overrides);  
     # Translate the remaining parameters.  
     my @retVal = ();  
     for my $inputParm (@inputList) {  
         push @retVal, UnEscape($inputParm);  
2208      }      }
2209      # Return the results.      # Return the result.
2210      return ($optionTable, @retVal);      return ($retVal, $pos, $len);
2211  }  }
2212    
2213  =head3 Escape  =head3 OpenDir
2214    
2215  C<< my $codedString = Tracer::Escape($realString); >>      my @files = OpenDir($dirName, $filtered, $flag);
2216    
2217  Escape a string for use in a command length. Tabs will be replaced by C<\t>, new-lines  Open a directory and return all the file names. This function essentially performs
2218  replaced by C<\n>, carriage returns will be deleted, and backslashes will be doubled. The  the functions of an C<opendir> and C<readdir>. If the I<$filtered> parameter is
2219  result is to reverse the effect of L</UnEscape>.  set to TRUE, all filenames beginning with a period (C<.>), dollar sign (C<$>),
2220    or pound sign (C<#>) and all filenames ending with a tilde C<~>) will be
2221    filtered out of the return list. If the directory does not open and I<$flag> is not
2222    set, an exception is thrown. So, for example,
2223    
2224        my @files = OpenDir("/Volumes/fig/contigs", 1);
2225    
2226    is effectively the same as
2227    
2228        opendir(TMP, "/Volumes/fig/contigs") || Confess("Could not open /Volumes/fig/contigs.");
2229        my @files = grep { $_ !~ /^[\.\$\#]/ && $_ !~ /~$/ } readdir(TMP);
2230    
2231    Similarly, the following code
2232    
2233        my @files = grep { $_ =~ /^\d/ } OpenDir("/Volumes/fig/orgs", 0, 1);
2234    
2235    Returns the names of all files in C</Volumes/fig/orgs> that begin with digits and
2236    automatically returns an empty list if the directory fails to open.
2237    
2238  =over 4  =over 4
2239    
2240  =item realString  =item dirName
2241    
2242  String to escape.  Name of the directory to open.
2243    
2244  =item RETURN  =item filtered
2245    
2246  Escaped equivalent of the real string.  TRUE if files whose names begin with a period (C<.>) should be automatically removed
2247    from the list, else FALSE.
2248    
2249    =item flag
2250    
2251    TRUE if a failure to open is okay, else FALSE
2252    
2253  =back  =back
2254    
2255  =cut  =cut
2256    #: Return Type @;
2257  sub Escape {  sub OpenDir {
2258      # Get the parameter.      # Get the parameters.
2259      my ($realString) = @_;      my ($dirName, $filtered, $flag) = @_;
2260      # Initialize the return variable.      # Declare the return variable.
2261      my $retVal = "";      my @retVal = ();
2262      # Loop through the parameter string, looking for sequences to escape.      # Open the directory.
2263      while (length $realString > 0) {      if (opendir(my $dirHandle, $dirName)) {
2264          # Look for the first sequence to escape.          # The directory opened successfully. Get the appropriate list according to the
2265          if ($realString =~ /^(.*?)([\n\t\r\\])/) {          # strictures of the filter parameter.
2266              # Here we found it. The text preceding the sequence is in $1. The sequence          if ($filtered) {
2267              # itself is in $2. First, move the clear text to the return variable.              @retVal = grep { $_ !~ /^[\.\$\#]/ && $_ !~ /~$/ } readdir $dirHandle;
             $retVal .= $1;  
             # Strip the processed section off the real string.  
             $realString = substr $realString, (length $2) + (length $1);  
             # Get the matched character.  
             my $char = $2;  
             # If we have a CR, we are done.  
             if ($char ne "\r") {  
                 # It's not a CR, so encode the escape sequence.  
                 $char =~ tr/\t\n/tn/;  
                 $retVal .= "\\" . $char;  
             }  
2268          } else {          } else {
2269              # Here there are no more escape sequences. The rest of the string is              @retVal = readdir $dirHandle;
             # transferred unmodified.  
             $retVal .= $realString;  
             $realString = "";  
2270          }          }
2271        } elsif (! $flag) {
2272            # Here the directory would not open and it's considered an error.
2273            Confess("Could not open directory $dirName.");
2274      }      }
2275      # Return the result.      # Return the result.
2276      return $retVal;      return @retVal;
2277  }  }
2278    
 =head3 UnEscape  
2279    
2280  C<< my $realString = Tracer::UnEscape($codedString); >>  =head3 Insure
2281    
2282        Insure($dirName, $chmod);
2283    
2284  Replace escape sequences with their actual equivalents. C<\t> will be replaced by  Insure a directory is present.
 a tab, C<\n> by a new-line character, and C<\\> by a backslash. C<\r> codes will  
 be deleted.  
2285    
2286  =over 4  =over 4
2287    
2288  =item codedString  =item dirName
2289    
2290  String to un-escape.  Name of the directory to check. If it does not exist, it will be created.
2291    
2292  =item RETURN  =item chmod (optional)
2293    
2294  Returns a copy of the original string with the escape sequences converted to their actual  Security privileges to be given to the directory if it is created.
 values.  
2295    
2296  =back  =back
2297    
2298  =cut  =cut
2299    
2300  sub UnEscape {  sub Insure {
2301      # Get the parameter.      my ($dirName, $chmod) = @_;
2302      my ($codedString) = @_;      if (! -d $dirName) {
2303      # Initialize the return variable.          Trace("Creating $dirName directory.") if T(2);
2304      my $retVal = "";          eval {
2305      # Only proceed if the incoming string is nonempty.              mkpath $dirName;
2306      if (defined $codedString) {              # If we have permissions specified, set them here.
2307          # Loop through the parameter string, looking for escape sequences. We can't do              if (defined($chmod)) {
2308          # translating because it causes problems with the escaped slash. ("\\t" becomes                  chmod $chmod, $dirName;
         # "\<tab>" no matter what we do.)  
         while (length $codedString > 0) {  
             # Look for the first escape sequence.  
             if ($codedString =~ /^(.*?)\\(\\|n|t|r)/) {  
                 # Here we found it. The text preceding the sequence is in $1. The sequence  
                 # itself is in $2. First, move the clear text to the return variable.  
                 $retVal .= $1;  
                 $codedString = substr $codedString, (2 + length $1);  
                 # Get the escape value.  
                 my $char = $2;  
                 # If we have a "\r", we are done.  
                 if ($char ne 'r') {  
                     # Here it's not an 'r', so we convert it.  
                     $char =~ tr/\\tn/\\\t\n/;  
                     $retVal .= $char;  
                 }  
             } else {  
                 # Here there are no more escape sequences. The rest of the string is  
                 # transferred unmodified.  
                 $retVal .= $codedString;  
                 $codedString = "";  
2309              }              }
2310            };
2311            if ($@) {
2312                Confess("Error creating $dirName: $@");
2313          }          }
2314      }      }
     # Return the result.  
     return $retVal;  
2315  }  }
2316    
2317  =head3 ParseRecord  =head3 ChDir
2318    
2319  C<< my @fields = Tracer::ParseRecord($line); >>      ChDir($dirName);
2320    
2321  Parse a tab-delimited data line. The data line is split into field values. Embedded tab  Change to the specified directory.
 and new-line characters in the data line must be represented as C<\t> and C<\n>, respectively.  
 These will automatically be converted.  
2322    
2323  =over 4  =over 4
2324    
2325  =item line  =item dirName
   
 Line of data containing the tab-delimited fields.  
   
 =item RETURN  
2326    
2327  Returns a list of the fields found in the data line.  Name of the directory to which we want to change.
2328    
2329  =back  =back
2330    
2331  =cut  =cut
2332    
2333  sub ParseRecord {  sub ChDir {
2334      # Get the parameter.      my ($dirName) = @_;
2335      my ($line) = @_;      if (! -d $dirName) {
2336      # Remove the trailing new-line, if any.          Confess("Cannot change to directory $dirName: no such directory.");
2337      chomp $line;      } else {
2338      # Split the line read into pieces using the tab character.          Trace("Changing to directory $dirName.") if T(File => 4);
2339      my @retVal = split /\t/, $line;          my $okFlag = chdir $dirName;
2340      # Trim and fix the escapes in each piece.          if (! $okFlag) {
2341      for my $value (@retVal) {              Confess("Error switching to directory $dirName.");
2342          # Trim leading whitespace.          }
         $value =~ s/^\s+//;  
         # Trim trailing whitespace.  
         $value =~ s/\s+$//;  
         # Delete the carriage returns.  
         $value =~ s/\r//g;  
         # Convert the escapes into their real values.  
         $value =~ s/\\t/"\t"/ge;  
         $value =~ s/\\n/"\n"/ge;  
2343      }      }
     # Return the result.  
     return @retVal;  
2344  }  }
2345    
2346  =head3 Merge  =head3 SetPermissions
2347    
2348  C<< my @mergedList = Tracer::Merge(@inputList); >>      Tracer::SetPermissions($dirName, $group, $mask, %otherMasks);
2349    
2350  Sort a list of strings and remove duplicates.  Set the permissions for a directory and all the files and folders inside it.
2351    In addition, the group ownership will be changed to the specified value.
2352    
2353    This method is more vulnerable than most to permission and compatability
2354    problems, so it does internal error recovery.
2355    
2356  =over 4  =over 4
2357    
2358  =item inputList  =item dirName
2359    
2360  List of scalars to sort and merge.  Name of the directory to process.
2361    
2362  =item RETURN  =item group
2363    
2364  Returns a list containing the same elements sorted in ascending order with duplicates  Name of the group to be assigned.
2365  removed.  
2366    =item mask
2367    
2368    Permission mask. Bits that are C<1> in this mask will be ORed into the
2369    permission bits of any file or directory that does not already have them
2370    set to 1.
2371    
2372    =item otherMasks
2373    
2374    Map of search patterns to permission masks. If a directory name matches
2375    one of the patterns, that directory and all its members and subdirectories
2376    will be assigned the new pattern. For example, the following would
2377    assign 01664 to most files, but would use 01777 for directories named C<tmp>.
2378    
2379        Tracer::SetPermissions($dirName, 'fig', 01664, '^tmp$' => 01777);
2380    
2381    The list is ordered, so the following would use 0777 for C<tmp1> and
2382    0666 for C<tmp>, C<tmp2>, or C<tmp3>.
2383    
2384        Tracer::SetPermissions($dirName, 'fig', 01664, '^tmp1' => 0777,
2385                                                       '^tmp' => 0666);
2386    
2387    Note that the pattern matches are all case-insensitive, and only directory
2388    names are matched, not file names.
2389    
2390  =back  =back
2391    
2392  =cut  =cut
2393    
2394  sub Merge {  sub SetPermissions {
2395      # Get the input list in sort order.      # Get the parameters.
2396      my @inputList = sort @_;      my ($dirName, $group, $mask, @otherMasks) = @_;
2397      # Only proceed if the list has at least two elements.      # Set up for error recovery.
2398      if (@inputList > 1) {      eval {
2399          # Now we want to move through the list splicing out duplicates.          # Switch to the specified directory.
2400          my $i = 0;          ChDir($dirName);
2401          while ($i < @inputList) {          # Get the group ID.
2402              # Get the current entry.          my $gid = getgrnam($group);
2403              my $thisEntry = $inputList[$i];          # Get the mask for tracing.
2404              # Find out how many elements duplicate the current entry.          my $traceMask = sprintf("%04o", $mask) . "($mask)";
2405              my $j = $i + 1;          Trace("Fixing permissions for directory $dirName using group $group($gid) and mask $traceMask.") if T(File => 2);
2406              my $dup1 = $i + 1;          my $fixCount = 0;
2407              while ($j < @inputList && $inputList[$j] eq $thisEntry) { $j++; };          my $lookCount = 0;
2408              # If the number is nonzero, splice out the duplicates found.          # @dirs will be a stack of directories to be processed.
2409              if ($j > $dup1) {          my @dirs = (getcwd());
2410                  splice @inputList, $dup1, $j - $dup1;          while (scalar(@dirs) > 0) {
2411                # Get the current directory.
2412                my $dir = pop @dirs;
2413                # Check for a match to one of the specified directory names. To do
2414                # that, we need to pull the individual part of the name off of the
2415                # whole path.
2416                my $simpleName = $dir;
2417                if ($dir =~ m!/([^/]+)$!) {
2418                    $simpleName = $1;
2419                }
2420                Trace("Simple directory name for $dir is $simpleName.") if T(File => 4);
2421                # Search for a match.
2422                my $match = 0;
2423                my $i;
2424                for ($i = 0; $i < $#otherMasks && ! $match; $i += 2) {
2425                    my $pattern = $otherMasks[$i];
2426                    if ($simpleName =~ /$pattern/i) {
2427                        $match = 1;
2428                    }
2429                }
2430                # Check for a match. Note we use $i-1 because the loop added 2
2431                # before terminating due to the match.
2432                if ($match && $otherMasks[$i-1] != $mask) {
2433                    # This directory matches one of the incoming patterns, and it's
2434                    # a different mask, so we process it recursively with that mask.
2435                    SetPermissions($dir, $group, $otherMasks[$i-1], @otherMasks);
2436                } else {
2437                    # Here we can process normally. Get all of the non-hidden members.
2438                    my @submems = OpenDir($dir, 1);
2439                    for my $submem (@submems) {
2440                        # Get the full name.
2441                        my $thisMem = "$dir/$submem";
2442                        Trace("Checking member $thisMem.") if T(4);
2443                        $lookCount++;
2444                        if ($lookCount % 1000 == 0) {
2445                            Trace("$lookCount members examined. Current is $thisMem. Mask is $traceMask") if T(File => 3);
2446              }              }
2447              # Now the element at position $dup1 is different from the element before it                      # Fix the group.
2448              # at position $i. We push $i forward one position and start again.                      chown -1, $gid, $thisMem;
2449              $i++;                      # Insure this member is not a symlink.
2450                        if (! -l $thisMem) {
2451                            # Get its info.
2452                            my $fileInfo = stat $thisMem;
2453                            # Only proceed if we got the info. Otherwise, it's a hard link
2454                            # and we want to skip it anyway.
2455                            if ($fileInfo) {
2456                                my $fileMode = $fileInfo->mode;
2457                                if (($fileMode & $mask) != $mask) {
2458                                    # Fix this member.
2459                                    $fileMode |= $mask;
2460                                    chmod $fileMode, $thisMem;
2461                                    $fixCount++;
2462          }          }
2463                                # If it's a subdirectory, stack it.
2464                                if (-d $thisMem) {
2465                                    push @dirs, $thisMem;
2466      }      }
     # Return the merged list.  
     return @inputList;  
2467  }  }
   
 =head3 Percent  
   
 C<< my $percent = Tracer::Percent($number, $base); >>  
   
 Returns the percent of the base represented by the given number. If the base  
 is zero, returns zero.  
   
 =over 4  
   
 =item number  
   
 Percent numerator.  
   
 =item base  
   
 Percent base.  
   
 =item RETURN  
   
 Returns the percentage of the base represented by the numerator.  
   
 =back  
   
 =cut  
   
 sub Percent {  
     # Get the parameters.  
     my ($number, $base) = @_;  
     # Declare the return variable.  
     my $retVal = 0;  
     # Compute the percent.  
     if ($base != 0) {  
         $retVal = $number * 100 / $base;  
2468      }      }
2469      # Return the result.                  }
2470      return $retVal;              }
2471            }
2472            Trace("$lookCount files and directories processed, $fixCount fixed.") if T(File => 2);
2473        };
2474        # Check for an error.
2475        if ($@) {
2476            Confess("SetPermissions error: $@");
2477        }
2478  }  }
2479    
2480  =head3 GetFile  =head3 GetLine
   
 C<< my @fileContents = Tracer::GetFile($fileName); >>  
   
     or  
2481    
2482  C<< my $fileContents = Tracer::GetFile($fileName); >>      my @data = Tracer::GetLine($handle);
2483    
2484  Return the entire contents of a file. In list context, line-ends are removed and  Read a line of data from a tab-delimited file.
 each line is a list element. In scalar context, line-ends are replaced by C<\n>.  
2485    
2486  =over 4  =over 4
2487    
2488  =item fileName  =item handle
2489    
2490  Name of the file to read.  Open file handle from which to read.
2491    
2492  =item RETURN  =item RETURN
2493    
2494  In a list context, returns the entire file as a list with the line terminators removed.  Returns a list of the fields in the record read. The fields are presumed to be
2495  In a scalar context, returns the entire file as a string. If an error occurs opening  tab-delimited. If we are at the end of the file, then an empty list will be
2496  the file, an empty list will be returned.  returned. If an empty line is read, a single list item consisting of a null
2497    string will be returned.
2498    
2499  =back  =back
2500    
2501  =cut  =cut
2502    
2503  sub GetFile {  sub GetLine {
2504      # Get the parameters.      # Get the parameters.
2505      my ($fileName) = @_;      my ($handle) = @_;
2506      # Declare the return variable.      # Declare the return variable.
2507      my @retVal = ();      my @retVal = ();
2508      # Open the file for input.      Trace("File position is " . tell($handle) . ". EOF flag is " . eof($handle) . ".") if T(File => 4);
2509      my $handle = Open(undef, "<$fileName");      # Read from the file.
2510      # Read the whole file into the return variable, stripping off any terminator      my $line = <$handle>;
2511      # characters.      # Only proceed if we found something.
2512      my $lineCount = 0;      if (defined $line) {
2513      while (my $line = <$handle>) {          # Remove the new-line. We are a bit over-cautious here because the file may be coming in via an
2514          $lineCount++;          # upload control and have a nonstandard EOL combination.
2515          $line = Strip($line);          $line =~ s/(\r|\n)+$//;
2516          push @retVal, $line;          # Here we do some fancy tracing to help in debugging complicated EOL marks.
2517            if (T(File => 4)) {
2518                my $escapedLine = $line;
2519                $escapedLine =~ s/\n/\\n/g;
2520                $escapedLine =~ s/\r/\\r/g;
2521                $escapedLine =~ s/\t/\\t/g;
2522                Trace("Line read: -->$escapedLine<--");
2523      }      }
2524      # Close it.          # If the line is empty, return a single empty string; otherwise, parse
2525      close $handle;          # it into fields.
2526      my $actualLines = @retVal;          if ($line eq "") {
2527      # Return the file's contents in the desired format.              push @retVal, "";
     if (wantarray) {  
         return @retVal;  
2528      } else {      } else {
2529          return join "\n", @retVal;              push @retVal, split /\t/,$line;
2530      }      }
2531        } else {
2532            # Trace the reason the read failed.
2533            Trace("End of file: $!") if T(File => 3);
2534        }
2535        # Return the result.
2536        return @retVal;
2537  }  }
2538    
2539  =head3 PutFile  =head3 PutLine
2540    
2541  C<< Tracer::PutFile($fileName, \@lines); >>      Tracer::PutLine($handle, \@fields, $eol);
2542    
2543  Write out a file from a list of lines of text.  Write a line of data to a tab-delimited file. The specified field values will be
2544    output in tab-separated form, with a trailing new-line.
2545    
2546  =over 4  =over 4
2547    
2548  =item fileName  =item handle
2549    
2550  Name of the output file.  Output file handle.
2551    
2552  =item lines  =item fields
2553    
2554  Reference to a list of text lines. The lines will be written to the file in order, with trailing  List of field values.
2555  new-line characters. Alternatively, may be a string, in which case the string will be written without  
2556  modification.  =item eol (optional)
2557    
2558    End-of-line character (default is "\n").
2559    
2560  =back  =back
2561    
2562  =cut  =cut
2563    
2564  sub PutFile {  sub PutLine {
2565      # Get the parameters.      # Get the parameters.
2566      my ($fileName, $lines) = @_;      my ($handle, $fields, $eol) = @_;
2567      # Open the output file.      # Write the data.
2568      my $handle = Open(undef, ">$fileName");      print $handle join("\t", @{$fields}) . ($eol || "\n");
     if (ref $lines ne 'ARRAY') {  
         # Here we have a scalar, so we write it raw.  
         print $handle $lines;  
     } else {  
         # Write the lines one at a time.  
         for my $line (@{$lines}) {  
             print $handle "$line\n";  
         }  
     }  
     # Close the output file.  
     close $handle;  
2569  }  }
2570    
 =head3 QTrace  
2571    
2572  C<< my $data = QTrace($format); >>  =head3 PrintLine
2573    
2574  Return the queued trace data in the specified format.      Tracer::PrintLine($line);
2575    
2576    Print a line of text with a trailing new-line.
2577    
2578  =over 4  =over 4
2579    
2580  =item format  =item line
2581    
2582  C<html> to format the data as an HTML list, C<text> to format it as straight text.  Line of text to print.
2583    
2584  =back  =back
2585    
2586  =cut  =cut
2587    
2588  sub QTrace {  sub PrintLine {
2589      # Get the parameter.      # Get the parameters.
2590      my ($format) = @_;      my ($line) = @_;
2591      # Create the return variable.      # Print the line.
2592      my $retVal = "";      print "$line\n";
     # Only proceed if there is an actual queue.  
     if (@Queue) {  
         # Process according to the format.  
         if ($format =~ m/^HTML$/i) {  
             # Convert the queue into an HTML list.  
             $retVal = "<ul>\n";  
             for my $line (@Queue) {  
                 my $escapedLine = CGI::escapeHTML($line);  
                 $retVal .= "<li>$escapedLine</li>\n";  
             }  
             $retVal .= "</ul>\n";  
         } elsif ($format =~ m/^TEXT$/i) {  
             # Convert the queue into a list of text lines.  
             $retVal = join("\n", @Queue) . "\n";  
         }  
         # Clear the queue.  
         @Queue = ();  
     }  
     # Return the formatted list.  
     return $retVal;  
2593  }  }
2594    
 =head3 Confess  
2595    
2596  C<< Confess($message); >>  =head2 Other Useful Methods
2597    
2598  Trace the call stack and abort the program with the specified message. When used with  =head3 ParseParm
 the OR operator and the L</Assert> method, B<Confess> can function as a debugging assert.  
 So, for example  
2599    
2600  C<< Assert($recNum >= 0) || Confess("Invalid record number $recNum."); >>      my $listValue = Tracer::ParseParm($string);
2601    
2602  Will abort the program with a stack trace if the value of C<$recNum> is negative.  Convert a parameter into a list reference. If the parameter is undefined,
2603    an undefined value will be returned. Otherwise, it will be parsed as a
2604    comma-separated list of values.
2605    
2606  =over 4  =over 4
2607    
2608  =item message  =item string
2609    
2610  Message to include in the trace.  Incoming string.
2611    
2612    =item RETURN
2613    
2614    Returns a reference to a list of values, or C<undef> if the incoming value
2615    was undefined.
2616    
2617  =back  =back
2618    
2619  =cut  =cut
2620    
2621  sub Confess {  sub ParseParm {
2622      # Get the parameters.      # Get the parameters.
2623      my ($message) = @_;      my ($string) = @_;
2624      # Trace the call stack.      # Declare the return variable.
2625      Cluck($message);      my $retVal;
2626      # Abort the program.      # Check for data.
2627      croak(">>> $message");      if (defined $string) {
2628  }          # We have some, so split it into a list.
2629            $retVal = [ split /\s*,\s*/, $string];
 =head3 Assert  
   
 C<< Assert($condition1, $condition2, ... $conditionN); >>  
   
 Return TRUE if all the conditions are true. This method can be used in conjunction with  
 the OR operator and the L</Confess> method as a debugging assert.  
 So, for example  
   
 C<< Assert($recNum >= 0) || Confess("Invalid record number $recNum."); >>  
   
 Will abort the program with a stack trace if the value of C<$recNum> is negative.  
   
 =cut  
 sub Assert {  
     my $retVal = 1;  
     LOOP: for my $condition (@_) {  
         if (! $condition) {  
             $retVal = 0;  
             last LOOP;  
         }  
2630      }      }
2631        # Return the result.
2632      return $retVal;      return $retVal;
2633  }  }
2634    
2635  =head3 Cluck  =head3 Now
   
 C<< Cluck($message); >>  
   
 Trace the call stack. Note that for best results, you should qualify the call with a  
 trace condition. For example,  
   
 C<< Cluck("Starting record parse.") if T(3); >>  
   
 will only trace the stack if the trace level for the package is 3 or more.  
   
 =over 4  
   
 =item message  
2636    
2637  Message to include in the trace.      my $string = Tracer::Now();
2638    
2639  =back  Return a displayable time stamp containing the local time. Whatever format this
2640    method produces must be parseable by L</ParseDate>.
2641    
2642  =cut  =cut
2643    
2644  sub Cluck {  sub Now {
2645      # Get the parameters.      return DisplayTime(time);
     my ($message) = @_;  
     # Trace what's happening.  
     Trace("Stack trace for event: $message");  
     my $confession = longmess($message);  
     # Convert the confession to a series of trace messages. Note we skip any  
     # messages relating to calls into Tracer.  
     for my $line (split /\s*\n/, $confession) {  
         Trace($line) if ($line !~ /Tracer\.pm/);  
     }  
2646  }  }
2647    
2648  =head3 Min  =head3 DisplayTime
2649    
2650  C<< my $min = Min($value1, $value2, ... $valueN); >>      my $string = Tracer::DisplayTime($time);
2651    
2652  Return the minimum argument. The arguments are treated as numbers.  Convert a time value to a displayable time stamp. Whatever format this
2653    method produces must be parseable by L</ParseDate>.
2654    
2655  =over 4  =over 4
2656    
2657  =item $value1, $value2, ... $valueN  =item time
2658    
2659  List of numbers to compare.  Time to display, in seconds since the epoch, or C<undef> if the time is unknown.
2660    
2661  =item RETURN  =item RETURN
2662    
2663  Returns the lowest number in the list.  Returns a displayable time, or C<(n/a)> if the incoming time is undefined.
2664    
2665  =back  =back
2666    
2667  =cut  =cut
2668    
2669  sub Min {  sub DisplayTime {
2670      # Get the parameters. Note that we prime the return value with the first parameter.      my ($time) = @_;
2671      my ($retVal, @values) = @_;      my $retVal = "(n/a)";
2672      # Loop through the remaining parameters, looking for the lowest.      if (defined $time) {
2673      for my $value (@values) {          my ($sec,$min,$hour,$mday,$mon,$year,$wday,$yday,$isdst) = localtime($time);
2674          if ($value < $retVal) {          $retVal = _p2($mon+1) . "/" . _p2($mday) . "/" . ($year + 1900) . " " .
2675              $retVal = $value;                    _p2($hour) . ":" . _p2($min) . ":" . _p2($sec);
         }  
2676      }      }
     # Return the minimum found.  
2677      return $retVal;      return $retVal;
2678  }  }
2679    
2680  =head3 Max  # Pad a number to 2 digits.
2681    sub _p2 {
2682        my ($value) = @_;
2683        $value = "0$value" if ($value < 10);
2684        return $value;
2685    }
2686    
2687  C<< my $max = Max($value1, $value2, ... $valueN); >>  =head3 Escape
2688    
2689  Return the maximum argument. The arguments are treated as numbers.      my $codedString = Tracer::Escape($realString);
2690    
2691    Escape a string for use in a command. Tabs will be replaced by C<\t>, new-lines
2692    replaced by C<\n>, carriage returns will be deleted, and backslashes will be doubled. The
2693    result is to reverse the effect of L</UnEscape>.
2694    
2695  =over 4  =over 4
2696    
2697  =item $value1, $value2, ... $valueN  =item realString
2698    
2699  List of numbers to compare.  String to escape.
2700    
2701  =item RETURN  =item RETURN
2702    
2703  Returns the highest number in the list.  Escaped equivalent of the real string.
2704    
2705  =back  =back
2706    
2707  =cut  =cut
2708    
2709  sub Max {  sub Escape {
2710      # Get the parameters. Note that we prime the return value with the first parameter.      # Get the parameter.
2711      my ($retVal, @values) = @_;      my ($realString) = @_;
2712      # Loop through the remaining parameters, looking for the highest.      # Initialize the return variable.
2713      for my $value (@values) {      my $retVal = "";
2714          if ($value > $retVal) {      # Loop through the parameter string, looking for sequences to escape.
2715              $retVal = $value;      while (length $realString > 0) {
2716            # Look for the first sequence to escape.
2717            if ($realString =~ /^(.*?)([\n\t\r\\])/) {
2718                # Here we found it. The text preceding the sequence is in $1. The sequence
2719                # itself is in $2. First, move the clear text to the return variable.
2720                $retVal .= $1;
2721                # Strip the processed section off the real string.
2722                $realString = substr $realString, (length $2) + (length $1);
2723                # Get the matched character.
2724                my $char = $2;
2725                # If we have a CR, we are done.
2726                if ($char ne "\r") {
2727                    # It's not a CR, so encode the escape sequence.
2728                    $char =~ tr/\t\n/tn/;
2729                    $retVal .= "\\" . $char;
2730                }
2731            } else {
2732                # Here there are no more escape sequences. The rest of the string is
2733                # transferred unmodified.
2734                $retVal .= $realString;
2735                $realString = "";
2736          }          }
2737      }      }
2738      # Return the maximum found.      # Return the result.
2739      return $retVal;      return $retVal;
2740  }  }
2741    
2742  =head3 AddToListMap  =head3 UnEscape
2743    
2744  C<< Tracer::AddToListMap(\%hash, $key, $value1, $value2, ... valueN); >>      my $realString = Tracer::UnEscape($codedString);
2745    
2746  Add a key-value pair to a hash of lists. If no value exists for the key, a singleton list  Replace escape sequences with their actual equivalents. C<\t> will be replaced by
2747  is created for the key. Otherwise, the new value is pushed onto the list.  a tab, C<\n> by a new-line character, and C<\\> by a backslash. C<\r> codes will
2748    be deleted.
2749    
2750  =over 4  =over 4
2751    
2752  =item hash  =item codedString
   
 Reference to the target hash.  
   
 =item key  
2753    
2754  Key for which the value is to be added.  String to un-escape.
2755    
2756  =item value1, value2, ... valueN  =item RETURN
2757    
2758  List of values to add to the key's value list.  Returns a copy of the original string with the escape sequences converted to their actual
2759    values.
2760    
2761  =back  =back
2762    
2763  =cut  =cut
2764    
2765  sub AddToListMap {  sub UnEscape {
2766      # Get the parameters.      # Get the parameter.
2767      my ($hash, $key, @values) = @_;      my ($codedString) = @_;
2768      # Process according to whether or not the key already has a value.      # Initialize the return variable.
2769      if (! exists $hash->{$key}) {      my $retVal = "";
2770          $hash->{$key} = [@values];      # Only proceed if the incoming string is nonempty.
2771        if (defined $codedString) {
2772            # Loop through the parameter string, looking for escape sequences. We can't do
2773            # translating because it causes problems with the escaped slash. ("\\t" becomes
2774            # "\<tab>" no matter what we do.)
2775            while (length $codedString > 0) {
2776                # Look for the first escape sequence.
2777                if ($codedString =~ /^(.*?)\\(\\|n|t|r)/) {
2778                    # Here we found it. The text preceding the sequence is in $1. The sequence
2779                    # itself is in $2. First, move the clear text to the return variable.
2780                    $retVal .= $1;
2781                    $codedString = substr $codedString, (2 + length $1);
2782                    # Get the escape value.
2783                    my $char = $2;
2784                    # If we have a "\r", we are done.
2785                    if ($char ne 'r') {
2786                        # Here it's not an 'r', so we convert it.
2787                        $char =~ tr/\\tn/\\\t\n/;
2788                        $retVal .= $char;
2789                    }
2790      } else {      } else {
2791          push @{$hash->{$key}}, @values;                  # Here there are no more escape sequences. The rest of the string is
2792                    # transferred unmodified.
2793                    $retVal .= $codedString;
2794                    $codedString = "";
2795      }      }
2796  }  }
   
 =head3 DebugMode  
   
 C<< if (Tracer::DebugMode) { ...code... } >>  
   
 Return TRUE if debug mode has been turned on, else output an error  
 page and return FALSE.  
   
 Certain CGI scripts are too dangerous to exist in the production  
 environment. This method provides a simple way to prevent them  
 from working unless they are explicitly turned on by creating a password  
 cookie via the B<SetPassword> script.  If debugging mode  
 is not turned on, an error web page will be output directing the  
 user to enter in the correct password.  
   
 =cut  
   
 sub DebugMode {  
     # Declare the return variable.  
     my $retVal = 0;  
     # Check the debug configuration.  
     my $password = CGI::cookie("DebugMode");  
     my $encrypted = Digest::MD5::md5_hex($password);  
     if ($encrypted eq "252dec43280e0c0d6a75ffcec486e61d") {  
         $retVal = 1;  
     } else {  
         # Here debug mode is off, so we generate an error page.  
         my $pageString = PageBuilder::Build("<<Html/ErrorPage.html", {}, "Html");  
         print $pageString;  
2797      }      }
2798      # Return the determination indicator.      # Return the result.
2799      return $retVal;      return $retVal;
2800  }  }
2801    
2802  =head3 Strip  =head3 Percent
2803    
2804  C<< my $string = Tracer::Strip($line); >>      my $percent = Tracer::Percent($number, $base);
2805    
2806  Strip all line terminators off a string. This is necessary when dealing with files  Returns the percent of the base represented by the given number. If the base
2807  that may have been transferred back and forth several times among different  is zero, returns zero.
 operating environments.  
2808    
2809  =over 4  =over 4
2810    
2811  =item line  =item number
2812    
2813  Line of text to be stripped.  Percent numerator.
2814    
2815    =item base
2816    
2817    Percent base.
2818    
2819  =item RETURN  =item RETURN
2820    
2821  The same line of text with all the line-ending characters chopped from the end.  Returns the percentage of the base represented by the numerator.
2822    
2823  =back  =back
2824    
2825  =cut  =cut
2826    
2827  sub Strip {  sub Percent {
2828      # Get a copy of the parameter string.      # Get the parameters.
2829      my ($string) = @_;      my ($number, $base) = @_;
2830      my $retVal = (defined $string ? $string : "");      # Declare the return variable.
2831      # Strip the line terminator characters.      my $retVal = 0;
2832      $retVal =~ s/(\r|\n)+$//g;      # Compute the percent.
2833        if ($base != 0) {
2834            $retVal = $number * 100 / $base;
2835        }
2836      # Return the result.      # Return the result.
2837      return $retVal;      return $retVal;
2838  }  }
2839    
2840  =head3 Pad  =head3 Constrain
2841    
2842  C<< my $paddedString = Tracer::Pad($string, $len, $left, $padChar); >>      my $constrained = Constrain($value, $min, $max);
2843    
2844  Pad a string to a specified length. The pad character will be a  Modify a numeric value to bring it to a point in between a maximum and a minimum.
 space, and the padding will be on the right side unless specified  
 in the third parameter.  
2845    
2846  =over 4  =over 4
2847    
2848  =item string  =item value
   
 String to be padded.  
   
 =item len  
2849    
2850  Desired length of the padded string.  Value to constrain.
2851    
2852  =item left (optional)  =item min (optional)
2853    
2854  TRUE if the string is to be left-padded; otherwise it will be padded on the right.  Minimum permissible value. If this parameter is undefined, no minimum constraint will be applied.
2855    
2856  =item padChar (optional)  =item max (optional)
2857    
2858  Character to use for padding. The default is a space.  Maximum permissible value. If this parameter is undefined, no maximum constraint will be applied.
2859    
2860  =item RETURN  =item RETURN
2861    
2862  Returns a copy of the original string with the pad character added to the  Returns the incoming value, constrained according to the other parameters.
 specified end so that it achieves the desired length.  
2863    
2864  =back  =back
2865    
2866  =cut  =cut
2867    
2868  sub Pad {  sub Constrain {
2869      # Get the parameters.      # Get the parameters.
2870      my ($string, $len, $left, $padChar) = @_;      my ($value, $min, $max) = @_;
2871      # Compute the padding character.      # Declare the return variable.
2872      if (! defined $padChar) {      my $retVal = $value;
2873          $padChar = " ";      # Apply the minimum constraint.
2874      }      if (defined $min && $retVal < $min) {
2875      # Compute the number of spaces needed.          $retVal = $min;
2876      my $needed = $len - length $string;      }
2877      # Copy the string into the return variable.      # Apply the maximum constraint.
2878      my $retVal = $string;      if (defined $max && $retVal > $max) {
2879      # Only proceed if padding is needed.          $retVal = $max;
     if ($needed > 0) {  
         # Create the pad string.  
         my $pad = $padChar x $needed;  
         # Affix it to the return value.  
         if ($left) {  
             $retVal = $pad . $retVal;  
         } else {  
             $retVal .= $pad;  
         }  
2880      }      }
2881      # Return the result.      # Return the result.
2882      return $retVal;      return $retVal;
2883  }  }
2884    
2885  =head3 EOF  =head3 Min
   
 This is a constant that is lexically greater than any useful string.  
   
 =cut  
   
 sub EOF {  
     return "\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF";  
 }  
   
 =head3 TICK  
   
 C<< my @results = TICK($commandString); >>  
   
 Perform a back-tick operation on a command. If this is a Windows environment, any leading  
 dot-slash (C<./> will be removed. So, for example, if you were doing  
   
     `./protein.cgi`  
   
 from inside a CGI script, it would work fine in Unix, but would issue an error message  
 in Windows complaining that C<'.'> is not a valid command. If instead you code  
2886    
2887      TICK("./protein.cgi")      my $min = Min($value1, $value2, ... $valueN);
2888    
2889  it will work correctly in both environments.  Return the minimum argument. The arguments are treated as numbers.
2890    
2891  =over 4  =over 4
2892    
2893  =item commandString  =item $value1, $value2, ... $valueN
2894    
2895  The command string to pass to the system.  List of numbers to compare.
2896    
2897  =item RETURN  =item RETURN
2898    
2899  Returns the standard output from the specified command, as a list.  Returns the lowest number in the list.
2900    
2901  =back  =back
2902    
2903  =cut  =cut
2904  #: Return Type @;  
2905  sub TICK {  sub Min {
2906      # Get the parameters.      # Get the parameters. Note that we prime the return value with the first parameter.
2907      my ($commandString) = @_;      my ($retVal, @values) = @_;
2908      # Chop off the dot-slash if this is Windows.      # Loop through the remaining parameters, looking for the lowest.
2909      if ($FIG_Config::win_mode) {      for my $value (@values) {
2910          $commandString =~ s!^\./!!;          if ($value < $retVal) {
2911                $retVal = $value;
2912      }      }
2913      # Activate the command and return the result.      }
2914      return `$commandString`;      # Return the minimum found.
2915        return $retVal;
2916  }  }
2917    
2918  =head3 ScriptSetup  =head3 Max
   
 C<< my ($query, $varHash) = ScriptSetup(); >>  
   
 Perform standard tracing and debugging setup for scripts. The value returned is  
 the CGI object followed by a pre-built variable hash.  
   
 The C<Trace> query parameter is used to determine whether or not tracing is active and  
 which trace modules (other than C<Tracer> and C<FIG>) should be turned on. Specifying  
 the C<CGI> trace module will trace parameter and environment information. Parameters are  
 traced at level 3 and environment variables at level 4. At the end of the script, the  
 client should call L</ScriptFinish> to output the web page.  
   
 =cut  
2919    
2920  sub ScriptSetup {      my $max = Max($value1, $value2, ... $valueN);
     # Get the CGI query object.  
     my $query = CGI->new();  
     # Check for tracing. Set it up if the user asked for it.  
     if ($query->param('Trace')) {  
         # Set up tracing.  
         my $ttype = ($query->param('TF') ? ">$FIG_Config::temp/Trace$$.log" : "QUEUE");  
         TSetup($query->param('Trace') . " FIG Tracer", $ttype);  
         # Trace the parameter and environment data.  
         TraceParms($query);  
     } else {  
         # Here tracing is to be turned off. All we allow is errors traced into the  
         # error log.  
         TSetup("0", "WARN");  
     }  
     # Create the variable hash.  
     my $varHash = { DebugData => '' };  
     # Return the query object and variable hash.  
     return ($query, $varHash);  
 }  
2921    
2922  =head3 TraceParms  Return the maximum argument. The arguments are treated as numbers.
2923    
2924  C<< Tracer::TraceParms($query); >>  =over 4
2925    
2926  Trace the CGI parameters at trace level CGI => 3 and the environment variables  =item $value1, $value2, ... $valueN
 at level CGI => 4.  
2927    
2928  =over 4  List of numbers to compare.
2929    
2930  =item query  =item RETURN
2931    
2932  CGI query object containing the parameters to trace.  Returns the highest number in the list.
2933    
2934  =back  =back
2935    
2936  =cut  =cut
2937    
2938  sub TraceParms {  sub Max {
2939      # Get the parameters.      # Get the parameters. Note that we prime the return value with the first parameter.
2940      my ($query) = @_;      my ($retVal, @values) = @_;
2941      if (T(CGI => 3)) {      # Loop through the remaining parameters, looking for the highest.
2942          # Here we want to trace the parameter data.      for my $value (@values) {
2943          my @names = $query->param;          if ($value > $retVal) {
2944          for my $parmName (sort @names) {              $retVal = $value;
             # Note we skip "Trace", which is for our use only.  
             if ($parmName ne 'Trace') {  
                 my @values = $query->param($parmName);  
                 Trace("CGI: $parmName = " . join(", ", @values));  
             }  
         }  
         # Now output a GET-style URL for this query.  
         my $getURL = $query->url(-relative => 1, -query => 1);  
         # Strip out the Trace parameters.  
         $getURL =~ s/Trace=\d[^;&]+[;&]//;  
         $getURL =~ s/TF=\d[;&]//;  
         # Output the URL.  
         Trace("URL: ../FIG/$getURL");  
         # Display the request method.  
         my $method = $query->request_method();  
         Trace("Method: $method");  
     }  
     if (T(CGI => 4)) {  
         # Here we want the environment data too.  
         for my $envName (sort keys %ENV) {  
             Trace("ENV: $envName = $ENV{$envName}");  
2945          }          }
2946      }      }
2947        # Return the maximum found.
2948        return $retVal;
2949  }  }
2950    
 =head3 ScriptFinish  
   
 C<< ScriptFinish($webData, $varHash); >>  
   
 Output a web page at the end of a script. Either the string to be output or the  
 name of a template file can be specified. If the second parameter is omitted,  
 it is assumed we have a string to be output; otherwise, it is assumed we have the  
 name of a template file. The template should have the variable C<DebugData>  
 specified in any form that invokes a standard script. If debugging mode is turned  
 on, a form field will be put in that allows the user to enter tracing data.  
 Trace messages will be placed immediately before the terminal C<BODY> tag in  
 the output, formatted as a list.  
2951    
2952  A typical standard script would loook like the following.  =head3 Strip
   
     BEGIN {  
         # Print the HTML header.  
         print "CONTENT-TYPE: text/html\n\n";  
     }  
     use Tracer;  
     use CGI;  
     use FIG;  
     # ... more uses ...  
2953    
2954      my ($query, $varHash) = ScriptSetup();      my $string = Tracer::Strip($line);
     eval {  
         # ... get data from $query, put it in $varHash ...  
     };  
     if ($@) {  
         Trace("Script Error: $@") if T(0);  
     }  
     ScriptFinish("Html/MyTemplate.html", $varHash);  
2955    
2956  The idea here is that even if the script fails, you'll see trace messages and  Strip all line terminators off a string. This is necessary when dealing with files
2957  useful output.  that may have been transferred back and forth several times among different
2958    operating environments.
2959    
2960  =over 4  =over 4
2961    
2962  =item webData  =item line
2963    
2964  A string containing either the full web page to be written to the output or the  Line of text to be stripped.
 name of a template file from which the page is to be constructed. If the name  
 of a template file is specified, then the second parameter must be present;  
 otherwise, it must be absent.  
2965    
2966  =item varHash (optional)  =item RETURN
2967    
2968  If specified, then a reference to a hash mapping variable names for a template  The same line of text with all the line-ending characters chopped from the end.
 to their values. The template file will be read into memory, and variable markers  
 will be replaced by data in this hash reference.  
2969    
2970  =back  =back
2971    
2972  =cut  =cut
2973    
2974  sub ScriptFinish {  sub Strip {
2975      # Get the parameters.      # Get a copy of the parameter string.
2976      my ($webData, $varHash) = @_;      my ($string) = @_;
2977      # Check for a template file situation.      my $retVal = (defined $string ? $string : "");
2978      my $outputString;      # Strip the line terminator characters.
2979      if (defined $varHash) {      $retVal =~ s/(\r|\n)+$//g;
2980          # Here we have a template file. We need to determine the template type.      # Return the result.
2981          my $template;      return $retVal;
         if ($FIG_Config::template_url && $webData =~ /\.php$/) {  
             $template = "$FIG_Config::template_url/$webData";  
         } else {  
             $template = "<<$webData";  
         }  
         $outputString = PageBuilder::Build($template, $varHash, "Html");  
     } else {  
         # Here the user gave us a raw string.  
         $outputString = $webData;  
     }  
     # Check for trace messages.  
     if ($Destination eq "QUEUE") {  
         # We have trace messages, so we want to put them at the end of the body. This  
         # is either at the end of the whole string or at the beginning of the BODY  
         # end-tag.  
         my $pos = length $outputString;  
         if ($outputString =~ m#</body>#gi) {  
             $pos = (pos $outputString) - 7;  
         }  
         substr $outputString, $pos, 0, QTrace('Html');  
     }  
     # Write the output string.  
     print $outputString;  
2982  }  }
2983    
2984  =head3 Insure  =head3 Pad
2985    
2986  C<< Insure($dirName); >>      my $paddedString = Tracer::Pad($string, $len, $left, $padChar);
2987    
2988  Insure a directory is present.  Pad a string to a specified length. The pad character will be a
2989    space, and the padding will be on the right side unless specified
2990    in the third parameter.
2991    
2992  =over 4  =over 4
2993    
2994  =item dirName  =item string
   
 Name of the directory to check. If it does not exist, it will be created.  
2995    
2996  =back  String to be padded.
2997    
2998  =cut  =item len
2999    
3000  sub Insure {  Desired length of the padded string.
     my ($dirName) = @_;  
     if (! -d $dirName) {  
         Trace("Creating $dirName directory.") if T(2);  
         eval { mkpath $dirName; };  
         if ($@) {  
             Confess("Error creating $dirName: $@");  
         }  
     }  
 }  
3001    
3002  =head3 ChDir  =item left (optional)
3003    
3004  C<< ChDir($dirName); >>  TRUE if the string is to be left-padded; otherwise it will be padded on the right.
3005    
3006  Change to the specified directory.  =item padChar (optional)
3007    
3008  =over 4  Character to use for padding. The default is a space.
3009    
3010  =item dirName  =item RETURN
3011    
3012  Name of the directory to which we want to change.  Returns a copy of the original string with the pad character added to the
3013    specified end so that it achieves the desired length.
3014    
3015  =back  =back
3016    
3017  =cut  =cut
3018    
3019  sub ChDir {  sub Pad {
3020      my ($dirName) = @_;      # Get the parameters.
3021      if (! -d $dirName) {      my ($string, $len, $left, $padChar) = @_;
3022          Confess("Cannot change to directory $dirName: no such directory.");      # Compute the padding character.
3023        if (! defined $padChar) {
3024            $padChar = " ";
3025        }
3026        # Compute the number of spaces needed.
3027        my $needed = $len - length $string;
3028        # Copy the string into the return variable.
3029        my $retVal = $string;
3030        # Only proceed if padding is needed.
3031        if ($needed > 0) {
3032            # Create the pad string.
3033            my $pad = $padChar x $needed;
3034            # Affix it to the return value.
3035            if ($left) {
3036                $retVal = $pad . $retVal;
3037      } else {      } else {
3038          Trace("Changing to directory $dirName.") if T(4);              $retVal .= $pad;
         my $okFlag = chdir $dirName;  
         if (! $okFlag) {  
             Confess("Error switching to directory $dirName.");  
3039          }          }
3040      }      }
3041        # Return the result.
3042        return $retVal;
3043  }  }
3044    
3045  =head3 SendSMS  =head3 EOF
3046    
3047  C<< my $msgID = Tracer::SendSMS($phoneNumber, $msg); >>  This is a constant that is lexically greater than any useful string.
3048    
3049  Send a text message to a phone number using Clickatell. The FIG_Config file must contain the  =cut
 user name, password, and API ID for the relevant account in the hash reference variable  
 I<$FIG_Config::phone>, using the keys C<user>, C<password>, and C<api_id>. For  
 example, if the user name is C<BruceTheHumanPet>, the password is C<silly>, and the API ID  
 is C<2561022>, then the FIG_Config file must contain  
3050    
3051      $phone =  { user => 'BruceTheHumanPet',  sub EOF {
3052                  password => 'silly',      return "\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF";
3053                  api_id => '2561022' };  }
3054    
3055  The original purpose of this method was to insure Bruce would be notified immediately when the  =head3 TICK
 Sprout Load terminates. Care should be taken if you do not wish Bruce to be notified immediately  
 when you call this method.  
3056    
3057  The message ID will be returned if successful, and C<undef> if an error occurs.      my @results = TICK($commandString);
3058    
3059  =over 4  Perform a back-tick operation on a command. If this is a Windows environment, any leading
3060    dot-slash (C<./> will be removed. So, for example, if you were doing
3061    
3062  =item phoneNumber      `./protein.cgi`
3063    
3064  Phone number to receive the message, in international format. A United States phone number  from inside a CGI script, it would work fine in Unix, but would issue an error message
3065  would be prefixed by "1". A British phone number would be prefixed by "44".  in Windows complaining that C<'.'> is not a valid command. If instead you code
3066    
3067  =item msg      TICK("./protein.cgi")
3068    
3069  Message to send to the specified phone.  it will work correctly in both environments.
3070    
3071    =over 4
3072    
3073    =item commandString
3074    
3075    The command string to pass to the system.
3076    
3077  =item RETURN  =item RETURN
3078    
3079  Returns the message ID if successful, and C<undef> if the message could not be sent.  Returns the standard output from the specified command, as a list.
3080    
3081  =back  =back
3082    
3083  =cut  =cut
3084    #: Return Type @;
3085  sub SendSMS {  sub TICK {
3086      # Get the parameters.      # Get the parameters.
3087      my ($phoneNumber, $msg) = @_;      my ($commandString) = @_;
3088      # Declare the return variable. If we do not change it, C<undef> will be returned.      # Chop off the dot-slash if this is Windows.
3089      my $retVal;      if ($FIG_Config::win_mode) {
3090      # Only proceed if we have phone support.          $commandString =~ s!^\./!!;
     if (! defined $FIG_Config::phone) {  
         Trace("Phone support not present in FIG_Config.") if T(1);  
     } else {  
         # Get the phone data.  
         my $parms = $FIG_Config::phone;  
         # Get the Clickatell URL.  
         my $url = "http://api.clickatell.com/http/";  
         # Create the user agent.  
         my $ua = LWP::UserAgent->new;  
         # Request a Clickatell session.  
         my $resp = $ua->post("$url/sendmsg", { user => $parms->{user},  
                                      password => $parms->{password},  
                                      api_id => $parms->{api_id},  
                                      to => $phoneNumber,  
                                      text => $msg});  
         # Check for an error.  
         if (! $resp->is_success) {  
             Trace("Alert failed.") if T(1);  
         } else {  
             # Get the message ID.  
             my $rstring = $resp->content;  
             if ($rstring =~ /^ID:\s+(.*)$/) {  
                 $retVal = $1;  
             } else {  
                 Trace("Phone attempt failed with $rstring") if T(1);  
             }  
         }  
3091      }      }
3092      # Return the result.      # Activate the command and return the result.
3093      return $retVal;      return `$commandString`;
3094  }  }
3095    
3096    
3097  =head3 CommaFormat  =head3 CommaFormat
3098    
3099  C<< my $formatted = Tracer::CommaFormat($number); >>      my $formatted = Tracer::CommaFormat($number);
3100    
3101  Insert commas into a number.  Insert commas into a number.
3102    
# Line 2234  Line 3129 
3129      # Return the result.      # Return the result.
3130      return $retVal;      return $retVal;
3131  }  }
 =head3 SetPermissions  
   
 C<< Tracer::SetPermissions($dirName, $group, $mask, %otherMasks); >>  
   
 Set the permissions for a directory and all the files and folders inside it.  
 In addition, the group ownership will be changed to the specified value.  
   
 This method is more vulnerable than most to permission and compatability  
 problems, so it does internal error recovery.  
   
 =over 4  
   
 =item dirName  
   
 Name of the directory to process.  
   
 =item group  
   
 Name of the group to be assigned.  
   
 =item mask  
   
 Permission mask. Bits that are C<1> in this mask will be ORed into the  
 permission bits of any file or directory that does not already have them  
 set to 1.  
   
 =item otherMasks  
3132    
 Map of search patterns to permission masks. If a directory name matches  
 one of the patterns, that directory and all its members and subdirectories  
 will be assigned the new pattern. For example, the following would  
 assign 01664 to most files, but would use 01777 for directories named C<tmp>.  
   
     Tracer::SetPermissions($dirName, 'fig', 01664, '^tmp$' => 01777);  
   
 The list is ordered, so the following would use 0777 for C<tmp1> and  
 0666 for C<tmp>, C<tmp2>, or C<tmp3>.  
   
     Tracer::SetPermissions($dirName, 'fig', 01664, '^tmp1' => 0777,  
                                                    '^tmp' => 0666);  
   
 Note that the pattern matches are all case-insensitive, and only directory  
 names are matched, not file names.  
   
 =back  
   
 =cut  
   
 sub SetPermissions {  
     # Get the parameters.  
     my ($dirName, $group, $mask, @otherMasks) = @_;  
     # Set up for error recovery.  
     eval {  
         # Switch to the specified directory.  
         ChDir($dirName);  
         # Get the group ID.  
         my $gid = getgrnam($group);  
         # Get the mask for tracing.  
         my $traceMask = sprintf("%04o", $mask) . "($mask)";  
         Trace("Fixing permissions for directory $dirName using group $group($gid) and mask $traceMask.") if T(2);  
         my $fixCount = 0;  
         my $lookCount = 0;  
         # @dirs will be a stack of directories to be processed.  
         my @dirs = (getcwd());  
         while (scalar(@dirs) > 0) {  
             # Get the current directory.  
             my $dir = pop @dirs;  
             # Check for a match to one of the specified directory names. To do  
             # that, we need to pull the individual part of the name off of the  
             # whole path.  
             my $simpleName = $dir;  
             if ($dir =~ m!/([^/]+)$!) {  
                 $simpleName = $1;  
             }  
             Trace("Simple directory name for $dir is $simpleName.") if T(4);  
             # Search for a match.  
             my $match = 0;  
             my $i;  
             for ($i = 0; $i < $#otherMasks && ! $match; $i += 2) {  
                 my $pattern = $otherMasks[$i];  
                 if ($simpleName =~ /$pattern/i) {  
                     $match = 1;  
                 }  
             }  
             # Check for a match. Note we use $i-1 because the loop added 2  
             # before terminating due to the match.  
             if ($match && $otherMasks[$i-1] != $mask) {  
                 # This directory matches one of the incoming patterns, and it's  
                 # a different mask, so we process it recursively with that mask.  
                 SetPermissions($dir, $group, $otherMasks[$i-1], @otherMasks);  
             } else {  
                 # Here we can process normally. Get all of the non-hidden members.  
                 my @submems = OpenDir($dir, 1);  
                 for my $submem (@submems) {  
                     # Get the full name.  
                     my $thisMem = "$dir/$submem";  
                     Trace("Checking member $thisMem.") if T(4);  
                     $lookCount++;  
                     if ($lookCount % 1000 == 0) {  
                         Trace("$lookCount members examined. Current is $thisMem. Mask is $traceMask") if T(3);  
                     }  
                     # Fix the group.  
                     chown -1, $gid, $thisMem;  
                     # Insure this member is not a symlink.  
                     if (! -l $thisMem) {  
                         # Get its info.  
                         my $fileInfo = stat $thisMem;  
                         # Only proceed if we got the info. Otherwise, it's a hard link  
                         # and we want to skip it anyway.  
                         if ($fileInfo) {  
                             my $fileMode = $fileInfo->mode;  
                             if (($fileMode & $mask) != $mask) {  
                                 # Fix this member.  
                                 $fileMode |= $mask;  
                                 chmod $fileMode, $thisMem;  
                                 $fixCount++;  
                             }  
                             # If it's a subdirectory, stack it.  
                             if (-d $thisMem) {  
                                 push @dirs, $thisMem;  
                             }  
                         }  
                     }  
                 }  
             }  
         }  
         Trace("$lookCount files and directories processed, $fixCount fixed.") if T(2);  
     };  
     # Check for an error.  
     if ($@) {  
         Confess("SetPermissions error: $@");  
     }  
 }  
3133    
3134  =head3 CompareLists  =head3 CompareLists
3135    
3136  C<< my ($inserted, $deleted) = Tracer::CompareLists(\@newList, \@oldList, $keyIndex); >>      my ($inserted, $deleted) = Tracer::CompareLists(\@newList, \@oldList, $keyIndex);
3137    
3138  Compare two lists of tuples, and return a hash analyzing the differences. The lists  Compare two lists of tuples, and return a hash analyzing the differences. The lists
3139  are presumed to be sorted alphabetically by the value in the $keyIndex column.  are presumed to be sorted alphabetically by the value in the $keyIndex column.
# Line 2435  Line 3198 
3198      return ($inserted, $deleted);      return ($inserted, $deleted);
3199  }  }
3200    
3201  =head3 GetLine  =head3 GenerateURL
3202    
3203  C<< my @data = Tracer::GetLine($handle); >>      my $queryUrl = Tracer::GenerateURL($page, %parameters);
3204    
3205  Read a line of data from a tab-delimited file.  Generate a GET-style URL for the specified page with the specified parameter
3206    names and values. The values will be URL-escaped automatically. So, for
3207    example
3208    
3209        Tracer::GenerateURL("form.cgi", type => 1, string => "\"high pass\" or highway")
3210    
3211    would return
3212    
3213        form.cgi?type=1;string=%22high%20pass%22%20or%20highway
3214    
3215  =over 4  =over 4
3216    
3217  =item handle  =item page
3218    
3219  Open file handle from which to read.  Page URL.
3220    
3221    =item parameters
3222    
3223    Hash mapping parameter names to parameter values.
3224    
3225  =item RETURN  =item RETURN
3226    
3227  Returns a list of the fields in the record read. The fields are presumed to be  Returns a GET-style URL that goes to the specified page and passes in the
3228  tab-delimited. If we are at the end of the file, then an empty list will be  specified parameters and values.
 returned. If an empty line is read, a single list item consisting of a null  
 string will be returned.  
3229    
3230  =back  =back
3231    
3232  =cut  =cut
3233    
3234  sub GetLine {  sub GenerateURL {
3235      # Get the parameters.      # Get the parameters.
3236      my ($handle) = @_;      my ($page, %parameters) = @_;
3237      # Declare the return variable.      # Prime the return variable with the page URL.
3238      my @retVal = ();      my $retVal = $page;
3239      # Read from the file.      # Loop through the parameters, creating parameter elements in a list.
3240      my $line = <$handle>;      my @parmList = map { "$_=" . uri_escape($parameters{$_}) } keys %parameters;
3241      # Only proceed if we found something.      # If the list is nonempty, tack it on.
3242      if (defined $line) {      if (@parmList) {
3243          # Remove the new-line.          $retVal .= "?" . join(";", @parmList);
         chomp $line;  
         # If the line is empty, return a single empty string; otherwise, parse  
         # it into fields.  
         if ($line eq "") {  
             push @retVal, "";  
         } else {  
             push @retVal, split /\t/,$line;  
         }  
3244      }      }
3245      # Return the result.      # Return the result.
3246      return @retVal;      return $retVal;
3247  }  }
3248    
3249  =head3 PutLine  =head3 ApplyURL
3250    
3251  C<< Tracer::PutLine($handle, \@fields); >>      Tracer::ApplyURL($table, $target, $url);
3252    
3253  Write a line of data to a tab-delimited file. The specified field values will be  Run through a two-dimensional table (or more accurately, a list of lists), converting the
3254  output in tab-separated form, with a trailing new-line.  I<$target> column to HTML text having a hyperlink to a URL in the I<$url> column. The
3255    URL column will be deleted by this process and the target column will be HTML-escaped.
3256    
3257    This provides a simple way to process the results of a database query into something
3258    displayable by combining a URL with text.
3259    
3260  =over 4  =over 4
3261    
3262  =item handle  =item table
3263    
3264  Output file handle.  Reference to a list of lists. The elements in the containing list will be updated by
3265    this method.
3266    
3267  =item fields  =item target
3268    
3269  List of field values.  The index of the column to be converted into HTML.
3270    
3271    =item url
3272    
3273    The index of the column containing the URL. Note that the URL must have a recognizable
3274    C<http:> at the beginning.
3275    
3276  =back  =back
3277    
3278  =cut  =cut
3279    
3280  sub PutLine {  sub ApplyURL {
3281      # Get the parameters.      # Get the parameters.
3282      my ($handle, $fields) = @_;      my ($table, $target, $url) = @_;
3283      # Write the data.      # Loop through the table.
3284      print $handle join("\t", @{$fields}) . "\n";      for my $row (@{$table}) {
3285            # Apply the URL to the target cell.
3286            $row->[$target] = CombineURL($row->[$target], $row->[$url]);
3287            # Delete the URL from the row.
3288            delete $row->[$url];
3289        }
3290  }  }
3291    
3292  =head3 GenerateURL  =head3 CombineURL
3293    
3294  C<< my $queryUrl = Tracer::GenerateURL($page, %parameters); >>      my $combinedHtml = Tracer::CombineURL($text, $url);
3295    
3296  Generate a GET-style URL for the specified page with the specified parameter  This method will convert the specified text into HTML hyperlinked to the specified
3297  names and values. The values will be URL-escaped automatically. So, for  URL. The hyperlinking will only take place if the URL looks legitimate: that is, it
3298  example  is defined and begins with an C<http:> header.
3299    
3300      Tracer::GenerateURL("form.cgi", type => 1, string => "\"high pass\" or highway")  =over 4
3301    
3302  would return  =item text
3303    
3304    Text to return. This will be HTML-escaped automatically.
3305    
3306    =item url
3307    
3308    A URL to be hyperlinked to the text. If it does not look like a URL, then the text
3309    will be returned without any hyperlinking.
3310    
3311    =item RETURN
3312    
3313    Returns the original text, HTML-escaped, with the URL hyperlinked to it. If the URL
3314    doesn't look right, the HTML-escaped text will be returned without any further
3315    modification.
3316    
3317    =back
3318    
3319    =cut
3320    
3321    sub CombineURL {
3322        # Get the parameters.
3323        my ($text, $url) = @_;
3324        # Declare the return variable.
3325        my $retVal = CGI::escapeHTML($text);
3326        # Verify the URL.
3327        if (defined($url) && $url =~ m!http://!i) {
3328            # It's good, so we apply it to the text.
3329            $retVal = "<a href=\"$url\">$retVal</a>";
3330        }
3331        # Return the result.
3332        return $retVal;
3333    }
3334    
3335      form.cgi?type=1&string=%22high%20pass%22%20or%20highway  =head3 Cmp
3336    
3337        my $cmp = Tracer::Cmp($a, $b);
3338    
3339    This method performs a universal sort comparison. Each value coming in is
3340    separated into a leading text part and a trailing number part. The text
3341    part is string compared, and if both parts are equal, then the number
3342    parts are compared numerically. A stream of just numbers or a stream of
3343    just strings will sort correctly, and a mixed stream will sort with the
3344    numbers first. Strings with a label and a number will sort in the
3345    expected manner instead of lexically.
3346    
3347  =over 4  =over 4
3348    
3349  =item page  =item a
3350    
3351  Page URL.  First item to compare.
3352    
3353  =item parameters  =item b
3354    
3355  Hash mapping parameter names to parameter values.  Second item to compare.
3356    
3357  =item RETURN  =item RETURN
3358    
3359  Returns a GET-style URL that goes to the specified page and passes in the  Returns a negative number if the first item should sort first (is less), a positive
3360  specified parameters and values.  number if the first item should sort second (is greater), and a zero if the items are
3361    equal.
3362    
3363  =back  =back
3364    
3365  =cut  =cut
3366    
3367  sub GenerateURL {  sub Cmp {
3368      # Get the parameters.      # Get the parameters.
3369      my ($page, %parameters) = @_;      my ($a, $b) = @_;
3370      # Prime the return variable with the page URL.      # Declare the return value.
3371      my $retVal = $page;      my $retVal;
3372      # Loop through the parameters, creating parameter elements in a list.      # Check for nulls.
3373      my @parmList = map { "$_=" . uri_escape($parameters{$_}) } keys %parameters;      if (! defined($a)) {
3374      # If the list is nonempty, tack it on.          $retVal = (! defined($b) ? 0 : -1);
3375      if (@parmList) {      } elsif (! defined($b)) {
3376          $retVal .= "?" . join("&", @parmList);          $retVal = 1;
3377        } else {
3378            # Here we have two real values. Parse the two strings.
3379            $a =~ /^(\D*)(\d*)$/;
3380            my $aParsed = [$1, $2];
3381            $b =~ /^(\D*)(\d*)$/;
3382            my $bParsed = [$1, $2];
3383            # Compare the string parts.
3384            $retVal = $aParsed->[0] cmp $bParsed->[0];
3385            if (! $retVal) {
3386                $retVal = $aParsed->[1] <=> $bParsed->[1];
3387            }
3388      }      }
3389      # Return the result.      # Return the result.
3390      return $retVal;      return $retVal;
3391  }  }
3392    
3393    
3394    =head3 TrackingCode
3395    
3396        my $html = Tracer::TrackingCode();
3397    
3398    Returns the HTML code for doing web page traffic monitoring. If the
3399    current environment is a test system, then it returns a null string;
3400    otherwise, it returns a bunch of javascript containing code for turning
3401    on SiteMeter and Google Analytics.
3402    
3403    =cut
3404    
3405    sub TrackingCode {
3406        # Declare the return variable.
3407        my $retVal = "<!-- tracking off -->";
3408        # Determine if we're in production.
3409        if ($FIG_Config::site_meter) {
3410            $retVal = <<END_HTML
3411            <!-- Site Meter -->
3412            <script type="text/javascript" src="http://s20.sitemeter.com/js/counter.js?site=s20nmpdr">
3413            </script>
3414            <noscript>
3415            <a href="http://s20.sitemeter.com/stats.asp?site=s20nmpdr" target="_top">
3416            <img src="http://s20.sitemeter.com/meter.asp?site=s20nmpdr" alt="Site Meter" border="0"/></a>
3417            </noscript>
3418            <!-- Copyright (c)2006 Site Meter -->
3419    END_HTML
3420        }
3421   &